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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:傅翔 大小:eCwaXNrC74474KB 下载:0EYMXxWA99747次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:Y9m4LIyw38255条
日期:2020-08-14 00:09:15
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "More's the pity," answered Telemachus, "I am sorry for him, butwe must leave him to himself just now. If people could have everythingtheir own way, the first thing I should choose would be the returnof my father; but go, and give your message; then make haste backagain, and do not turn out of your way to tell Laertes. Tell my motherto send one of her women secretly with the news at once, and let himhear it from her."
2.  "'The third man,' he answered, 'is Ulysses who dwells in Ithaca. Ican see him in an island sorrowing bitterly in the house of thenymph Calypso, who is keeping him prisoner, and he cannot reach hishome for he has no ships nor sailors to take him over the sea. Asfor your own end, Menelaus, you shall not die in Argos, but the godswill take you to the Elysian plain, which is at the ends of the world.There fair-haired Rhadamanthus reigns, and men lead an easier lifethan any where else in the world, for in Elysium there falls not rain,nor hail, nor snow, but Oceanus breathes ever with a West wind thatsings softly from the sea, and gives fresh life to all men. Thiswill happen to you because you have married Helen, and are Jove'sson-in-law.'
3.  Telemachus went and knocked at the door of the women's room. "Makehaste," said he, "you old woman who have been set over all the otherwomen in the house. Come outside; my father wishes to speak to you."
4.  Then Telemachus went out of the court to the place where theAchaeans were meeting in assembly; he had his spear in his hand, andhe was not alone, for his two dogs went with him. But Eurycleacalled the maids and said, "Come, wake up; set about sweeping thecloisters and sprinkling them with water to lay the dust; put thecovers on the seats; wipe down the tables, some of you, with a wetsponge; clean out the mixing-jugs and the cups, and for water from thefountain at once; the suitors will be here directly; they will be hereearly, for it is a feast day."
5.  "Thus through the livelong day to the going down of the sun wefeasted our fill on meat and drink, but when the sun went down andit came on dark, we camped upon the beach. When the child ofmorning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, I bade my men on board andloose the hawsers. Then they took their places and smote the greysea with their oars; so we sailed on with sorrow in our hearts, butglad to have escaped death though we had lost our comrades.
6.  When the bright star that heralds the approach of dawn began toshow. the ship drew near to land. Now there is in Ithaca a haven ofthe old merman Phorcys, which lies between two points that break theline of the sea and shut the harbour in. These shelter it from thestorms of wind and sea that rage outside, so that, when once withinit, a ship may lie without being even moored. At the head of thisharbour there is a large olive tree, and at no distance a fineoverarching cavern sacred to the nymphs who are called Naiads. Thereare mixing-bowls within it and wine-jars of stone, and the bees hivethere. Moreover, there are great looms of stone on which the nymphsweave their robes of sea purple- very curious to see- and at all timesthere is water within it. It has two entrances, one facing North bywhich mortals can go down into the cave, while the other comes fromthe South and is more mysterious; mortals cannot possibly get in byit, it is the way taken by the gods.

计划指导

1.  Then the vision said, "Take heart, and be not so much dismayed.There is one gone with him whom many a man would be glad enough tohave stand by his side, I mean Minerva; it is she who has compassionupon you, and who has sent me to bear you this message."
2.  As he spoke he went up to Ulysses and saluted him with his righthand; "Good day to you, father stranger," said he, "you seem to bevery poorly off now, but I hope you will have better times by andby. Father Jove, of all gods you are the most malicious. We are yourown children, yet you show us no mercy in all our misery andafflictions. A sweat came over me when I saw this man, and my eyesfilled with tears, for he reminds me of Ulysses, who I fear is goingabout in just such rags as this man's are, if indeed he is still amongthe living. If he is already dead and in the house of Hades, then,alas! for my good master, who made me his stockman when I was quiteyoung among the Cephallenians, and now his cattle are countless; noone could have done better with them than I have, for they have bredlike ears of corn; nevertheless I have to keep bringing them in forothers to eat, who take no heed of his son though he is in thehouse, and fear not the wrath of heaven, but are already eager todivide Ulysses' property among them because he has been away solong. I have often thought- only it would not be right while his sonis living- of going off with the cattle to some foreign country; badas this would be, it is still harder to stay here and be ill-treatedabout other people's herds. My position is intolerable, and I shouldlong since have run away and put myself under the protection of someother chief, only that I believe my poor master will yet return, andsend all these suitors flying out of the house."
3.  "Fear not, nurse," answered Telemachus, "my scheme is not withoutheaven's sanction; but swear that you will say nothing about allthis to my mother, till I have been away some ten or twelve days,unless she hears of my having gone, and asks you; for I do not wanther to spoil her beauty by crying."
4.  "Father Jove," said she, "and all you other gods that live ineverlasting bliss, I hope there may never be such a thing as a kindand well-disposed ruler any more, nor one who will govern equitably. Ihope they will be all henceforth cruel and unjust, for there is notone of his subjects but has forgotten Ulysses, who ruled them asthough he were their father. There he is, lying in great pain in anisland where dwells the nymph Calypso, who will not let him go; and hecannot get back to his own country, for he can find neither shipsnor sailors to take him over the sea. Furthermore, wicked people arenow trying to murder his only son Telemachus, who is coming homefrom Pylos and Lacedaemon, where he has been to see if he can get newsof his father."
5.  The words were hardly out of his mouth before his son stood at thedoor. Eumaeus sprang to his feet, and the bowls in which he was mixingwine fell from his hands, as he made towards his master. He kissed hishead and both his beautiful eyes, and wept for joy. A father could notbe more delighted at the return of an only son, the child of his oldage, after ten years' absence in a foreign country and after havinggone through much hardship. He embraced him, kissed him all over asthough he had come back from the dead, and spoke fondly to him saying:
6.  Meanwhile lovely Polycaste, Nestor's youngest daughter, washedTelemachus. When she had washed him and anointed him with oil, shebrought him a fair mantle and shirt, and he looked like a god as hecame from the bath and took his seat by the side of Nestor. When theouter meats were done they drew them off the spits and sat down todinner where they were waited upon by some worthy henchmen, who keptpouring them out their wine in cups of gold. As soon as they had hadhad enough to eat and drink Nestor said, "Sons, put Telemachus'shorses to the chariot that he may start at once."

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1.  "And I said, 'Circe, no man with any sense of what is right canthink of either eating or drinking in your house until you have sethis friends free and let him see them. If you want me to eat anddrink, you must free my men and bring them to me that I may see themwith my own eyes.'
2.  On this they rose and went to the water side. The crew then drew theship on shore; their servants took their armour from them, and theywent up in a body to the place of assembly, but they would not let anyone old or young sit along with them, and Antinous, son ofEupeithes, spoke first.
3.  "'Cyclops,' said I, 'you should have taken better measure of yourman before eating up his comrades in your cave. You wretch, eat upyour visitors in your own house? You might have known that your sinwould find you out, and now Jove and the other gods have punishedyou.'
4.  Ulysses was glad when he heard the omens conveyed to him by thewoman's speech, and by the thunder, for he knew they meant that heshould avenge himself on the suitors.
5.   "Alcinous," said he, "it is not creditable to you that a strangershould be seen sitting among the ashes of your hearth; every one iswaiting to hear what you are about to say; tell him, then, to rise andtake a seat on a stool inlaid with silver, and bid your servants mixsome wine and water that we may make a drink-offering to Jove the lordof thunder, who takes all well-disposed suppliants under hisprotection; and let the housekeeper give him some supper, ofwhatever there may be in the house."
6.  "The first ghost 'that came was that of my comrade Elpenor, for hehad not yet been laid beneath the earth. We had left his bodyunwaked and unburied in Circe's house, for we had had too much else todo. I was very sorry for him, and cried when I saw him: 'Elpenor,'said I, 'how did you come down here into this gloom and darkness?You have here on foot quicker than I have with my ship.'

应用

1.  "Call him here, then," said Penelope, "that I too may hear hisstory. As for the suitors, let them take their pleasure indoors or outas they will, for they have nothing to fret about. Their corn and wineremain unwasted in their houses with none but servants to consumethem, while they keep hanging about our house day after daysacrificing our oxen, sheep, and fat goats for their banquets, andnever giving so much as a thought to the quantity of wine theydrink. No estate can stand such recklessness, for we have now noUlysses to protect us. If he were to come again, he and his sonwould soon have their revenge."
2.  As he spoke he drew his rags aside from the great scar, and whenthey had examined it thoroughly, they both of them wept about Ulysses,threw their arms round him and kissed his head and shoulders, whileUlysses kissed their hands and faces in return. The sun would havegone down upon their mourning if Ulysses had not checked them andsaid:
3.  While Ulysses was thus yielding himself to a very deep slumberthat eased the burden of his sorrows, his admirable wife awoke, andsitting up in her bed began to cry. When she had relieved herself byweeping she prayed to Diana saying, "Great Goddess Diana, daughterof Jove, drive an arrow into my heart and slay me; or let somewhirlwind snatch me up and bear me through paths of darkness till itdrop me into the mouths of overflowing Oceanus, as it did thedaughters of Pandareus. The daughters of Pandareus lost their fatherand mother, for the gods killed them, so they were left orphans. ButVenus took care of them, and fed them on cheese, honey, and sweetwine. Juno taught them to excel all women in beauty of form andunderstanding; Diana gave them an imposing presence, and Minervaendowed them with every kind of accomplishment; but one day when Venushad gone up to Olympus to see Jove about getting them married (forwell does he know both what shall happen and what not happen toevery one) the storm winds came and spirited them away to becomehandmaids to the dread Erinyes. Even so I wish that the gods wholive in heaven would hide me from mortal sight, or that fair Dianamight strike me, for I would fain go even beneath the sad earth if Imight do so still looking towards Ulysses only, and without havingto yield myself to a worse man than he was. Besides, no matter howmuch people may grieve by day, they can put up with it so long as theycan sleep at night, for when the eyes are closed in slumber peopleforget good and ill alike; whereas my misery haunts me even in mydreams. This very night methought there was one lying by my side whowas like Ulysses as he was when he went away with his host, and Irejoiced, for I believed that it was no dream, but the very truthitself."
4、  Meanwhile the suitors were throwing discs or aiming with spears at amark on the levelled ground in front of Ulysses' house, and werebehaving with all their old insolence. Antinous and Eurymachus, whowere their ringleaders and much the foremost among them all, weresitting together when Noemon son of Phronius came up and said toAntinous,
5、  When she had thus spoken she led the way rapidly before him, andUlysses followed in her steps; so the pair, goddess and man, went onand on till they came to Calypso's cave, where Ulysses took the seatthat Mercury had just left. Calypso set meat and drink before him ofthe food that mortals eat; but her maids brought ambrosia and nectarfor herself, and they laid their hands on the good things that werebefore them. When they had satisfied themselves with meat and drink,Calypso spoke, saying:

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  • 龙武国 08-13

      "I will tell you the truth, my son," replied Ulysses. "It was thePhaeacians who brought me here. They are great sailors, and are in thehabit of giving escorts to any one who reaches their coasts. They tookme over the sea while I was fast asleep, and landed me in Ithaca,after giving me many presents in bronze, gold, and raiment. Thesethings by heaven's mercy are lying concealed in a cave, and I am nowcome here on the suggestion of Minerva that we may consult aboutkilling our enemies. First, therefore, give me a list of thesuitors, with their number, that I may learn who, and how many, theyare. I can then turn the matter over in my mind, and see whether wetwo can fight the whole body of them ourselves, or whether we mustfind others to help us."

  • 肖水金 08-13

      He began with his victory over the Cicons, and how he thence reachedthe fertile land of the Lotus-eaters. He told her all about theCyclops and how he had punished him for having so ruthlessly eaten hisbrave comrades; how he then went on to Aeolus, who received himhospitably and furthered him on his way, but even so he was not toreach home, for to his great grief a hurricane carried him out tosea again; how he went on to the Laestrygonian city Telepylos, wherethe people destroyed all his ships with their crews, save himselfand his own ship only. Then he told of cunning Circe and her craft,and how he sailed to the chill house of Hades, to consult the ghost ofthe Theban prophet Teiresias, and how he saw his old comrades in arms,and his mother who bore him and brought him up when he was a child;how he then heard the wondrous singing of the Sirens, and went on tothe wandering rocks and terrible Charybdis and to Scylla, whom noman had ever yet passed in safety; how his men then ate the cattleof the sun-god, and how Jove therefore struck the ship with histhunderbolts, so that all his men perished together, himself alonebeing left alive; how at last he reached the Ogygian island and thenymph Calypso, who kept him there in a cave, and fed him, and wantedhim to marry her, in which case she intended making him immortal sothat he should never grow old, but she could not persuade him to lether do so; and how after much suffering he had found his way to thePhaeacians, who had treated him as though he had been a god, andsent him back in a ship to his own country after having given himgold, bronze, and raiment in great abundance. This was the lastthing about which he told her, for here a deep sleep took hold uponhim and eased the burden of his sorrows.

  • 张兰萍 08-13

       "My dear nurse," said Penelope, "however wise you may be you canhardly fathom the counsels of the gods. Nevertheless, we will go insearch of my son, that I may see the corpses of the suitors, and theman who has killed them."

  • 严凤英 08-13

      In the end he deemed it best to take to the woods, and he foundone upon some high ground not far from the water. There he creptbeneath two shoots of olive that grew from a single stock- the onean ungrafted sucker, while the other had been grafted. No wind,however squally, could break through the cover they afforded, norcould the sun's rays pierce them, nor the rain get through them, soclosely did they grow into one another. Ulysses crept under theseand began to make himself a bed to lie on, for there was a greatlitter of dead leaves lying about- enough to make a covering for twoor three men even in hard winter weather. He was glad enough to seethis, so he laid himself down and heaped the leaves all round him.Then, as one who lives alone in the country, far from any neighbor,hides a brand as fire-seed in the ashes to save himself from having toget a light elsewhere, even so did Ulysses cover himself up withleaves; and Minerva shed a sweet sleep upon his eyes, closed hiseyelids, and made him lose all memories of his sorrows.

  • 隋琛 08-12

    {  Telemachus did as his father said, and went off to the store roomwhere the armour was kept. He chose four shields, eight spears, andfour brass helmets with horse-hair plumes. He brought them with allspeed to his father, and armed himself first, while the stockman andthe swineherd also put on their armour, and took their places nearUlysses. Meanwhile Ulysses, as long as his arrows lasted, had beenshooting the suitors one by one, and they fell thick on one another:when his arrows gave out, he set the bow to stand against the end wallof the house by the door post, and hung a shield four hides thickabout his shoulders; on his comely head he set his helmet, wellwrought with a crest of horse-hair that nodded menacingly above it,and he grasped two redoubtable bronze-shod spears.

  • 包山 08-11

      "Very well," replied Telemachus, "go home when you have had yourdinner, and in the morning come here with the victims we are tosacrifice for the day. Leave the rest to heaven and me."}

  • 迈克尔·杰克逊 08-11

      "My dears, heaven has been pleased to try me with more afflictionthan any other woman of my age and country. First I lost my braveand lion-hearted husband, who had every good quality under heaven, andwhose name was great over all Hellas and middle Argos, and now mydarling son is at the mercy of the winds and waves, without myhaving heard one word about his leaving home. You hussies, there wasnot one of you would so much as think of giving me a call out of mybed, though you all of you very well knew when he was starting. If Ihad known he meant taking this voyage, he would have had to give itup, no matter how much he was bent upon it, or leave me a corpsebehind him- one or other. Now, however, go some of you and call oldDolius, who was given me by my father on my marriage, and who is mygardener. Bid him go at once and tell everything to Laertes, who maybe able to hit on some plan for enlisting public sympathy on our side,as against those who are trying to exterminate his own race and thatof Ulysses."

  • 刘鸣 08-11

      "I will tell you then truth," replied her son. "We went to Pylos andsaw Nestor, who took me to his house and treated me as hospitably asthough I were a son of his own who had just returned after a longabsence; so also did his sons; but he said he had not heard a wordfrom any human being about Ulysses, whether he was alive or dead. Hesent me, therefore, with a chariot and horses to Menelaus. There I sawHelen, for whose sake so many, both Argives and Trojans, were inheaven's wisdom doomed to suffer. Menelaus asked me what it was thathad brought me to Lacedaemon, and I told him the whole truth,whereon he said, 'So, then, these cowards would usurp a brave man'sbed? A hind might as well lay her new-born young in the lair of alion, and then go off to feed in the forest or in some grassy dell.The lion, when he comes back to his lair, will make short work withthe pair of them, and so will Ulysses with these suitors. By fatherJove, Minerva, and Apollo, if Ulysses is still the man that he waswhen he wrestled with Philomeleides in Lesbos, and threw him soheavily that all the Greeks cheered him- if he is still such, and wereto come near these suitors, they would have a short shrift and a sorrywedding. As regards your question, however, I will not prevaricate nordeceive you, but what the old man of the sea told me, so much will Itell you in full. He said he could see Ulysses on an islandsorrowing bitterly in the house of the nymph Calypso, who waskeeping him prisoner, and he could not reach his home, for he had noships nor sailors to take him over the sea.' This was what Menelaustold me, and when I had heard his story I came away; the gods thengave me a fair wind and soon brought me safe home again."

  • 文池威 08-10

       The suitors bit their lips, and marvelled at the boldness of hisspeech; then Antinous said, "We do not like such language but wewill put up with it, for Telemachus is threatening us in good earnest.If Jove had let us we should have put a stop to his brave talk erenow."

  • 林振刚 08-08

    {  She did not say a word about her own wedding, for she did not liketo, but her father knew and said, "You shall have the mules, mylove, and whatever else you have a mind for. Be off with you, andthe men shall get you a good strong waggon with a body to it that willhold all your clothes."

  • 袁灿灿 08-08

      "Antinous," answered Telemachus, "I cannot eat in peace, nor takepleasure of any kind with such men as you are. Was it not enoughthat you should waste so much good property of mine while I was yeta boy? Now that I am older and know more about it, I am also stronger,and whether here among this people, or by going to Pylos, I will doyou all the harm I can. I shall go, and my going will not be in vainthough, thanks to you suitors, I have neither ship nor crew of my own,and must be passenger not captain."

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