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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:王懋莉 大小:K28nPqde51898KB 下载:Vizjy4nu14557次
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日期:2020-08-10 18:40:01
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马里奥-查尔默斯

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  These things, and many more (fitter for silence, then forpublication) were so deepely displeasing to the Jew, being a mostsober and modest man; that he had soone seene enough, resolving on hisreturne to Paris, which very speedily he performed. And whenJehannot heard of his arrivall, crediting much rather other newes fromhim, then ever to see him a converted Christian; he went to welcomehim, and kindly they feasted one another. After some few dayes ofresting, Jehannot demanded of him; what he thought of our holyFather the Pope and his Cardinals, and generally of all the otherCourtiers? Whereto the Jew readily answered; It is strange Jehannot,that God should give them so much as he doth. For I will truely tellthee, that if I had beene able to consider all those things, whichthere I have both heard and seene: I could then have resolved myselfe, never to have found in any Priest, either sanctity, devotion,good worke, example of honest life, or any good thing else beside. Butif a man desire to see luxury, avarice, gluttony, and such wickedthings, yea, worse, if worse may be, and held in generall estimationof all men; let him but goe to Rome, which I thinke rather to be theforge of damnable actions, then any way leaning to grace or goodnesse.And, for ought I could perceive, me thinkes your chiefe Pastour, and(consequently) all the rest of his dependants, doe strive so much asthey may (with all their engine arte and endevour) to bring tonothing, or else to banish quite out of the world, Christian Religion,whereof they should be the support and foundation.
2.  By this time, Conrado and his wife, who had followed closely afterthe hounds, was come thither, and seeing what had hapned, looking onthe Lady, who was become blacke, swarthy, meager, and hairy, theywondered not a little at her, and she a great deale more at them. When(uppon her request) Conrado had checkt backe his hounds, theyprevailed so much by earnest intreaties, to know what she was, and thereason of her living there; that she intirely related her quality,unfortunate accidents, and strange determination for living there.Which when the Gentleman had heard, who very well knew her husband,compassion forced teares from his eyes, and earnestly he laboured bykinde perswasions, to alter so cruell a deliberation; making anhonourable offer, for conducting her home to his owne dwelling,where shee should remaine with him in noble respect, as if she werehis owne sister, without parting from him, till Fortune should smileas fairely on her, as ever she had done before.
3.  Within a while after, pretending to have some speech withGianetta, and holding the Gentleman still by the arme, the Physicioncaused her to be sent for; and immediately shee came. Upon her veryentrance into the Chamber, the pulse began to beate againe extreamely,and when shee departed, it presently ceased. Now was he thorowlyperswaded, that he had found the true effect of his sicknesse, whentaking the Father and mother aside, thus he spake to them. If you bedesirous of your Sons health, it consisteth not either in Physicion orphysicke, but in the mercy of your faire Maide Gianetta; formanifest signes have made it knowne to me, and he loveth theDamosell very dearely: yet (for ought I can perceive, the Maide dothnot know it:) now if you have respect of his life, you know (in thiscase) what is to be done. The Nobleman and his Wife hearing this,became somewhat satisfied, because there remained a remedy to preservehis life: but yet it was no meane griefe to them, if it should sosucceede, as they feared, namely, the marriage betweene this theirSonne and Gianetta.
4.  To dance and sing;
5.  The Lord Abbot wondred not a little, that a robber on the highwayes, should have such a bold and liberall spirit, which appearedvery pleasing to him; and instantly, his former hatred and spleeneagainst Ghinotto, became converted into cordiall love and kindnes,so that (imbracing him in his armes) he said. I protest upon my vowmade to Religion, that to win the love of such a man, as I plainelyperceive thee to be: I would undergo far greater injuries, thenthose which I have received at thy hands. Accursed be cruelldestiny, that forced thee to so base a kind of life, and did notblesse thee with a fairer fortune. After he had thus spoken, he leftthere the greater part of all his goods, and returned backe againeto Rome, with few horses, and a meaner traine.
6.  DECLARING THE DISCREETE PROVIDENCE OF PARENTS, IN CARE OF THEIR

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1.  And keepe me dying in a living grave.
2.  Sister (quoth she) if I were faithfully assured of thy secrecie, Iwould tell thee a thing which I have often thought on, and it may(perhaps) redound to thy profit. Sister, replyed the other Nun, speakeyour minde boldly, and beleeve it (on my Maidenhead) that I will neverreveale it to any creature living. Encouraged by this solemne answere,the first Nun thus prosecuted her former purpose, saying. I know notSister, whether it hath entred into thine understanding or no,strictly we are here kept and attended, never any man daring toadventure among us, except our good and bonest Fac-totum, who isvery aged; and this dumbe fellow, maimed, and made imperfect bynature, and therefore not worthy the title of a man. Ah Sister, ithath oftentimes bin told me, by Gentlewomen comming hither to visiteus, that all other sweetes in the world, are mockeries, to theincomparable pleasures of man and woman, of which we are barred by ourunkind parents, binding us to perpetuall chastity, which they werenever able to observe themselves.
3.  While thus they continued talking, Andreana comming before herFather, the teares trickling mainly downe her cheekes, and fallingat his feete, she began in this manner. Deare Father, I shall notneede to make an Historicall relation, either of my youthfullboldnesse or misfortunes, because you have both seene and knowne them:rather most humbly, I crave your pardon, for another errour by meecommitted, in that, both without your leave and liking, I accepted theman as my troth-plighted husband, whom (above all other in the world Imost intirely affected. If my offence heerein doe challenge theforfeite of my life, then (good Father) I free you from any suchpardon; because my onely desire is to dye your daughter, and in yourgracious favour: with which words, in signe of her humility, shekissed his feete. Messer Negro da Ponte, being a man well in yeeres,and of a gentle nature, observing what his daughter saide, could notrefraine from teares, and in his weeping, lovingly tooke her fromthe ground, speaking thus to her.
4.  Sodainly, Marquiso bethought him how to do it, and proceeded thus.All the Sergeants for Justice standing at the Church doore, hee ranwith all possible speede to the Potestates Lieutenant, and said untohim. Good my Lord Justice, helpe me in an hard case; yonder is avillaine that hath cut my purse, I desire he may bee brought beforeyou, that I may have my money againe. He hearing this, sent for adozen of the Sergeants, who went to apprehend unhappy Martellino,and recover him from the peoples fury, leading him on with them to thePalace, no meane crowds thronging after him, when they heard that hewas accused to bee a Cutpurse. Now durst they meddle no more with him,but assisted the Officers; some of them charging him in like manner,that hee had cut their purses also.
5.  It came to passe, that in this time of his spending nothing, butmultiplying daily by infinite meanes, that a civill honest Gentleman(a Courtier of ready wit, and discoursive in Languages) came toGeneway, being named Guillaume Boursier. A man very farre differingfrom divers Courtiers in these dayes, who for soothing shamefull andgracelesse maners in such as allow them maintenance, are called andreputed to bee Gentlemen, yea speciall favourites: whereas much moreworthily, they should be accounted as knaves and villaines, beingborne and bred in all filthinesse, and skilfull in every kinde ofbasest behaviour, not fit to come in Princes Courts. For, whereas inpassed times, they spent their dayes and paines in making peace,when Gentlemen were at warre or dissention, or treating on honestmarriages, betweene friends and familiars, and (with lovingspeeches) would recreate disturbed mindes, desiring none butcommendable exercises in Court, and sharpely reprooving (like Fathers)disordred life, or ill actions in any, albeit with recompencelittle, or none at all; these upstarts now adayes, employ all theirpaines in detractions, sowing questions and quarrels betweene oneanother, making no spare of lyes and falshoods. Nay which is worse,they wil do this in the presence of any man, upbraiding him withinjuries, shames, and scandals (true or not true) upon the veryleast occasion. And by false and deceitful flatteries and villanies oftheir owne inventing, they make Gentlemen to become as vile asthemselves. For which detestable qualities, they are better belovedand respected of their misdemeanored Lords, and recompenced in morebountifull maner, then men of vertuous carriage and desert. Which isan argument sufficient, that goodnesse is gone up to heaven, andhath quite forsaken these loathed lower Regions, where men are drownedin the mud of all abhominable vices.
6.  THE THIRD DAY, THE FOURTH NOVELL

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1.  It fortuned, that King Charles in the Summer time) for hispleasure and recreation, went to repose himselfe (for some certaynedayes) at Castello de Mare, where having heard report of the beautieand singularitie of Signiour Neries Garden; hee grew very desirousto see it. But when he understoode to whome it belonged, then heentred into consideration with himselfe, that hee was an ancientKnight, maintaining a contrarie faction to his: wherefore, hethought it fit to goe in some familiar manner, and with no trayneattending on him. Wherupon he sent him word, that he wold come tovisit him, with foure Gentlemen onely in his companie, meaning tosup with him in his Garden the next night ensuing. The newes wasvery welcome to Signior Neri, who took order in costly maner for allthings to bee done, entertaining the King most joyfully into hisbeautifull Garden.
2.  Nor was he negligent in the observation of her amorous regards,but the Tinder tooke, and his soule flamed with the selfe same fire;making him as desirous of her loving acceptance, as possibly she couldbe of his: so that the commanding power of love, could not easily bedistinguished in which of them it had the greater predominance. Forevery day as he brought her fresh supply of woolles, and found herseriously busied at her wheele: her soule would vent forth manydeepe sighes, and those sighes fetch floods of teares from her eyes,thorough the singular good opinion she had conceyved of him, andearnest desire to enjoy him. Pasquino on the other side, as leysuregave him leave for the least conversing with her: his disease wasevery way answerable to hers, for teares stood in his eyes, sighesflew abroad, to ease the poore hearts afflicting oppressions, whichthough he was unable to conceale; yet would he seeme to clowd themcleanly, by entreating her that his Masters worke might be neatlyperformed, and with such speed as time would permit her, intermixinginfinite praises of her artificiall spinning; and affirming withall,that the Quilles of Yearne received from her, were the choisest beautyof the whole peece; so that when other workewomen played, Simonida wassure to want no employment.
3.  Neiphila cried out: "Mark this, Philostratus; in trying to teachus you might have had such a lesson as Masetto di Lamporechio had ofthe nuns, and recovered your speech just as your bare bones hadlearned to whistle without a master." Finding himself thus evenlymatched, Philostratus ceased his pleasantries; and beginning toconsider on the charge committed to his care, called the Master of thehoushold, to know in what estate all matters were, because where anydefect appeared, every thing might be the sooner remedied, for thebetter satisfaction of the company, during the time of hisauthority. Then returning backe to the assembly, thus he began. LovelyLadies, I would have you to know, that since the time of ability inme, to distinguish betweene good and evill, I have alwayes benesubject (perhaps by the meanes of some beauty heere among us) to theproud and imperious dominion of love, with expression of all duty,humility, and most intimate desire to please yet all hath prooved tono purpose, but still I have bin rejected for some other, whereby mycondition hath falne from ill to worse, and so still it is likely,even to the houre: of my death. In which respect, it best pleaseth me,that our conferences to morrow, shall extend to no other argument, bitonly such cases as are most conformable to my calamity, namely ofsuch, whose love hath had unhappy ending, because I await no otherissue of mine; nor willingly would I be called by any other name,but only, the miserable and unfortunate Lover.
4.  DANGERS, WHEREINTO MEN MAY DAYLY FALL.
5.   At the same time, there lived in Pistoya likewise, a young man,named Ricciardo, derived of meane birth, but very wealthy, quickewitted, and of commendable person, alwayes going so neate, fine, andformall in his apparrell, that he was generally tearmed the Magnifico,who had long time affected, yea, and closely courted, (though anyadvantage or successe) the Lady and wife of Signior Francesco, who wasvery beautifull, vertuous, and chaste. It so chanced, that thisMagnifico had the very choisest and goodliest ambling Gelding in allTuscany, which hee loved dearely, for his faire forme, and othergood parts. Upon a flying rumor throughout Pistoia, that he daily madelove to the foresaid Ladie, some busie-body put it into the head ofSignior Francesco, that if he pleased to request the Gelding, theMagnifico would frankely give it him, in regard of the love he bare tohis wife.
6.  As I poore amorous Maide.

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1.  WHEREIN IS SIGNIFIED THE POWER OF LOVE, AND THE DIVERSITY OF
2.  On the other side, Arriguccio had travelled so farre from his house,till he came at last to the dwelling of Simonidaes brethren: where heeknockt so soundly, that he was quickely heard, and (almost asspeedily) let in. Simonidaes brethren, and her mother also, hearing ofArriguccioes comming thither so late. Rose from their beds, and eachof them having a Waxe Candle lighted, came presently to him, tounderstand the cause of this his so unseasonable visitation.Arriguccio, beginning at the originall of the matter, the thredfound tyed about his wives great toe, the fight and housholdconflict after following: related every circumstance to them. Andfor the better proofe of his words, he shewed them the thred it selfe,the lockes supposed of his wives haire, and adding withall; thatthey might now dispose of Simonida as themselves pleased, becauseshe should remaine no longer in his house.
3.  When he had visited many Christian Provinces, and was ridingthorow Lombardle, to passe the mountaines; it fortuned, in hisjourneying from Millaine to Pavia, and the day being very farre spent,so that night hastened speedily on him: he met with a Gentleman, namedSignior Thorella d'Istria, but dwelling at Pavia, who with his men,Hawkes and Hounds, went to a house of his, seated in a singular place,and on the River of Ticinum. Signior Thorello seeing such men makingtowardes him, presently imagined, that they were someGentle-strangers, and such hee desired to respect with honor.
4、  Gentlemen, if I were in mine owne Country, as now I am in yours, Iwould as for wardly confesse my selfe your friend, as here I mustneedes fall short of any such service, but even as you shall please tocommand me. But plainely, and without all further ceremoniouscomplement, I must agree to whatsoever you can request; as thinkingyou to be more injured by me, then any great wrong that I havesustained. Concerning the young Damosell remaining in my House, she isnot (as many have imagined) either of Cremona, or Pavia, but borne aFaentine, here in this Citie: albeit neither my selfe, she, or he ofwhome I had her, did ever know it, or yet could learne whoseDaughter she was. Wherefore, the suite you make to me, should rather(in duty) be mine to you: for shee is a native of your owne, doe rightto her, and then you can doe no wrong unto mee.
5、  The Provoste gaining no other grace at this time, would not sogive over for this first repulse, but pursuing her still withunbeseeming importunity; many private meanes he used to her byLetters, tokens, and insinuating ambassages; yea, whensoever shee cameto the Church, he never ceased his wearisome solicitings. Whereatshe growing greatly offended, and perceyving no likelyhood of hisdesisting; became so tyred with his tedious suite, that she consideredwith her selfe, how she might dispatch him as he deserved, because shesaw no other remedy. Yet shee would not attempte anie thing in thiscase, without acquainting her Bretheren first therwith. And havingtolde them, how much shee was importuned by the Provost, and also whatcourse she meant to take (wherin they both counselled and encouragedher:) within a few daies after, shee went to Church as she was wont todo; where so soone as the Provost espyed her: forthwith he came toher, and according to his continued course, he fell into his amorouscourting. She looking upon him with a smiling countenance, and walkingaside with him out of any hearing: after he had spent many impertinentspeeches, shee (venting foorth manie a vehement sighe) at lengthreturned him this answer.

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  • 顾文剑 08-09

      Or live so happily as I.

  • 琳内特·佩金斯 08-09

      Now trust me Sir, (said Calandrino) that is an excellent Countrey todwell in: but I pray you tell me Sir, what do they with the Caponsafter they have boyld them? The Baschanes (quoth Maso) eate themall. Have you Sir, said Calandrino, at any time beene in thatCountrey? How? answered Maso, doe you demaund if have beene there? Yesman, above a thousand times, at the least. How farre Sir, I pray you(quoth Calandrino) is that worthy Countrey, from this our City? Introth, replyed Maso, the miles are hardly to be numbred, for themost part of them, we travell when we are nightly in our beddes, andif a man dreame right; he may be there upon a sudden.

  • 王晓峰 08-09

       The young man continuing his resort to the House of Puccio, andobserving the widdow to be faire, fresh, and prettily formall; hebegan to consider with himselfe, what those things might be, whereinshe was most wanting; and (if he could) to save anothers labour,supply them by his best endeavours. Thus not alwayes carrying his eyesbefore him, but using many backe and circumspect regards, he proceededso farre in his wylie apprehensions, that (by a few sparkes close kepttogether) he kindled part of the same fire in her, which began toflame apparantly in him. And hee very wittily observing the same, asoccasion first smiled on him, and allowed him favourableopportunity, so did hee impart his intention to her.

  • 杨阳腾 08-09

      Mervaile and amazement, encreased in Nicostratus far greater thenbefore, hearing him to avouch still so constantly what he had seene,no contradiction being able to alter him, which made him rashly sweareand say. I will see my selfe, whether this Peare-tree bee enchanted,or no: and such wonders to be seene when a man is up in it, as thouwouldst have us to beleeve. And being mounted up so hy, that they weresafe from his sodaine comming on them, Lydia had soone forgotten hersicknes, and the promised kisse cost her above twenty more, besideverie kinde and hearty embraces, as lovingly respected and entertainedby Pyrrhus. Which Nicostratus beholding aloft in the tree; cryed outto her, saying. Wicked woman, What doest thou meane? And thouvillain Pyrrhus, Darst thou abuse thy Lord, who hath reposed so muchtrust in thee? So, descending in haste downe againe, yet crying soto them still: Lydia replyed, Alas my Lord, Why do you raile andrave in such sort? So, he( found her seated as before, and Pyrrhuswaiting with dutiful reverence, even as when he climbed up the Tree:but yet he thought his sight not deceyved, for all their demure andformall behaviour, which made him walke up and downe, extreamelyfuming and fretting unto himselfe, and which in some milder mannerto qualifie, Pyrrhus spake thus to him.

  • 潘家峪 08-08

    {  SO IDLE HEADED UPON NO OCCASION. YET WHEN THEY HAVE GOOD REASON

  • 梅红 08-07

      THE SEVENTH DAY, THE SIXTH NOVELL}

  • 苏辙 08-07

      Some better assurance getting possession of her, as knowing himperfectly by his voice, and looking more stedfastly on his face, whichconstantly avouched him to be Theobaldo; the teares trickling amainedowne her faire cheekes, she ran to embrace him, casting her armesabout his necke, and kissing him a thousand times, my faithfullhusband, nothing in the world can be so welcom to me. Theobaldo havingmost kindly kissed and embraced her, said; Sweet wife, time wit notnow allow us those ceremonious courtesies, which (indeed) so long aseparation do justly challenge; for I must about a more weightybusines, to have your Father safely delivered, which I hope to dobefore to morow night when you shall heare tydings to your bettercontentment. And questionlesse, if I speed no worse then my goodhope perswadeth me, I will see you againe to night, and acquaint youat better leysure, in such things as I cannot do now at this present.

  • 布泽尔 08-07

      Philostratus, gladly I do accept your gift; and to the end that yemay the better remember your selfe, concerning what you have donehitherto: I will and command, that generall preparation be madeagainst to morrow, for faire and happy fortunes hapning to Lovers,after former cruell and unkinde accidents. Which proposition wasvery pleasing to them all.

  • 金尔 08-06

       As the rest, so did Madam Beritola goe on shore in the Iland,where having found a separate and solitary place, fit for her silentand sad meditations, secretly by her selfe, shee sorrowed for theabsence of her husband. Resorting daily to this her sad exercise,and continuing there her complaints, unseene by any of theMarriners, or whosoever else: there arrived suddenly a Galley ofPyrates, who seazing on the small Barke, carried it and all the restin it away with them. When Beritola had finished het wofullcomplaints, as daily shee was accustomed to doe, shee returned backeto her children againe; but find no person there remayning, whereatshe wondered not a little: immediately (suspecting what had happenedindeede) she lent her lookes on the Sea, and saw the Galley, whichas yet had not gone farre, drawing the smaller vessell after her.Hereby plainly she perceyved, that now she had lost her children, asformerly shee had done her husband; being left there poore,forsaken, and miserable, not knowing when, where, or how to findeany of them againe; and calling for her Husband and Children, sheefell downe in a swound uppon the shore.

  • 张沛欧 08-04

    {  WHEREBY PLAINLY APPEARETH, THAT THEY WHICH TAKE DELIGHT IN

  • 张志东 08-04

      It fortuned within few dayes after that Madam Lisetta being incompany with one of her Gossips, and their conference (as commonlyit falleth out to be) concerning other women of the City; theirbeauty, behaviour, amorous suters and servants, and generall opinionconceived of their worth, and merit; wherein Lisetta was over-muchconceyted of her selfe, not admitting any other to be her equall.Among other speeches, savouring of an unseasoned braine: Gossip (quothshe) if you knew what account is made of my beauty, and who holdesit in no meane estimation, you would then freely confesse, that Ideserve to be preferred before any other. As women are ambitious intheir owne opinions, so commonly are they covetous of one anotherssecrets, especially in matter of emulation, whereupon the Gossipthus replyed. Beleeve me Madam, I make no doubt but your speechesmay be true, in regard of your admired beauty, and many otherperfections beside; yet let me tell you, priviledges, how great andsingular soever they be, without they are knowen to others, besidesuch as do particularly enjoy them; they carry no more account, thenthings of ordinary estimation. Whereas on the contrary, when anyLady or Gentlewoman hath some eminent and peculiar favour, which fewor none other can reach unto, and it is made famous by generallnotion; then do all women else admire and honor her, as the glory oftheir kinde, and a miracle of Nature.

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