0 太子网上平台官方-APP安装下载浙江松阳发生矿山山体塌方,十余支救援队正参与施救

太子网上平台官方 注册最新版下载

太子网上平台官方 注册

太子网上平台官方注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:金亮 大小:dNcu9qN113391KB 下载:bFzAo5Gn74698次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:cjdY2zLb58675条
日期:2020-08-12 08:41:46
安卓
宫玉郡

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  He had hardly done speaking when Amphinomus turned in his placeand saw the ship inside the harbour, with the crew lowering her sails,and putting by their oars; so he laughed, and said to the others,"We need not send them any message, for they are here. Some god musthave told them, or else they saw the ship go by, and could notovertake her.
2.  "'Stranger,' said she, 'I will make it all quite clear to you. Aboutthe time when the sun shall have reached mid heaven, the old man ofthe sea comes up from under the waves, heralded by the West windthat furs the water over his head. As soon as he has come up he liesdown, and goes to sleep in a great sea cave, where the seals-Halosydne's chickens as they call them- come up also from the greysea, and go to sleep in shoals all round him; and a very strong andfish-like smell do they bring with them. Early to-morrow morning Iwill take you to this place and will lay you in ambush. Pick out,therefore, the three best men you have in your fleet, and I willtell you all the tricks that the old man will play you.
3.  "Your discretion, my friend," answered Menelaus, "is beyond youryears. It is plain you take after your father. One can soon see when aman is son to one whom heaven has blessed both as regards wife andoffspring- and it has blessed Nestor from first to last all hisdays, giving him a green old age in his own house, with sons about himwho are both we disposed and valiant. We will put an end thereforeto all this weeping, and attend to our supper again. Let water bepoured over our hands. Telemachus and I can talk with one anotherfully in the morning."
4.  "Now off their harbour there lies a wooded and fertile island notquite close to the land of the Cyclopes, but still not far. It isoverrun with wild goats, that breed there in great numbers and arenever disturbed by foot of man; for sportsmen- who as a rule willsuffer so much hardship in forest or among mountain precipices- do notgo there, nor yet again is it ever ploughed or fed down, but it lies awilderness untilled and unsown from year to year, and has no livingthing upon it but only goats. For the Cyclopes have no ships, noryet shipwrights who could make ships for them; they cannot thereforego from city to city, or sail over the sea to one another's country aspeople who have ships can do; if they had had these they would havecolonized the island, for it is a very good one, and would yieldeverything in due season. There are meadows that in some places comeright down to the sea shore, well watered and full of lusciousgrass; grapes would do there excellently; there is level land forploughing, and it would always yield heavily at harvest time, forthe soil is deep. There is a good harbour where no cables arewanted, nor yet anchors, nor need a ship be moored, but all one has todo is to beach one's vessel and stay there till the wind becomesfair for putting out to sea again. At the head of the harbour there isa spring of clear water coming out of a cave, and there are poplarsgrowing all round it.
5.  "Then some malicious god conveyed Ulysses to the upland farm wherehis swineherd lives. Thither presently came also his son, returningfrom a voyage to Pylos, and the two came to the town when they hadhatched their plot for our destruction. Telemachus came first, andthen after him, accompanied by the swineherd, came Ulysses, clad inrags and leaning on a staff as though he were some miserable oldbeggar. He came so unexpectedly that none of us knew him, not even theolder ones among us, and we reviled him and threw things at him. Heendured both being struck and insulted without a word, though he wasin his own house; but when the will of Aegis-bearing Jove inspiredhim, he and Telemachus took the armour and hid it in an inner chamber,bolting the doors behind them. Then he cunningly made his wife offerhis bow and a quantity of iron to be contended for by us ill-fatedsuitors; and this was the beginning of our end, for not one of uscould string the bow- nor nearly do so. When it was about to reach thehands of Ulysses, we all of us shouted out that it should not be givenhim, no matter what he might say, but Telemachus insisted on hishaving it. When he had got it in his hands he strung it with easeand sent his arrow through the iron. Then he stood on the floor of thecloister and poured his arrows on the ground, glaring fiercely abouthim. First he killed Antinous, and then, aiming straight before him,he let fly his deadly darts and they fell thick on one another. It wasplain that some one of the gods was helping them, for they fell uponus with might and main throughout the cloisters, and there was ahideous sound of groaning as our brains were being battered in, andthe ground seethed with our blood. This, Agamemnon, is how we cameby our end, and our bodies are lying still un-cared for in the houseof Ulysses, for our friends at home do not yet know what has happened,so that they cannot lay us out and wash the black blood from ourwounds, making moan over us according to the offices due to thedeparted."
6.  Then Penelope resolved that she would show herself to the suitors.She knew of the plot against Telemachus, for the servant Medon hadoverheard their counsels and had told her; she went down thereforeto the court attended by her maidens, and when she reached the suitorsshe stood by one of the bearing-posts supporting the roof of thecloister holding a veil before her face, and rebuked Antinous saying:

计划指导

1.  Then he said to Melanthius the goatherd, "Look sharp, light a firein the court, and set a seat hard by with a sheep skin on it; bring usalso a large ball of lard, from what they have in the house. Let uswarm the bow and grease it we will then make trial of it again, andbring the contest to an end."
2.  Then Ulysses answered, "Madam, wife of Ulysses, do not disfigureyourself further by grieving thus bitterly for your loss, though I canhardly blame you for doing so. A woman who has loved her husband andborne him children, would naturally be grieved at losing him, eventhough he were a worse man than Ulysses, who they say was like agod. Still, cease your tears and listen to what I can tell I will hidenothing from you, and can say with perfect truth that I have latelyheard of Ulysses as being alive and on his way home; he is among theThesprotians, and is bringing back much valuable treasure that hehas begged from one and another of them; but his ship and all his crewwere lost as they were leaving the Thrinacian island, for Jove and thesun-god were angry with him because his men had slaughtered thesun-god's cattle, and they were all drowned to a man. But Ulyssesstuck to the keel of the ship and was drifted on to the land of thePhaecians, who are near of kin to the immortals, and who treated himas though he had been a god, giving him many presents, and wishingto escort him home safe and sound. In fact Ulysses would have beenhere long ago, had he not thought better to go from land to landgathering wealth; for there is no man living who is so wily as heis; there is no one can compare with him. Pheidon king of theThesprotians told me all this, and he swore to me- makingdrink-offerings in his house as he did so- that the ship was by thewater side and the crew found who would take Ulysses to his owncountry. He sent me off first, for there happened to be aThesprotian ship sailing for the wheat-growing island of Dulichium,but he showed me all treasure Ulysses had got together, and he hadenough lying in the house of king Pheidon to keep his family for tengenerations; but the king said Ulysses had gone to Dodona that hemight learn Jove's mind from the high oak tree, and know whether afterso long an absence he should return to Ithaca openly or in secret.So you may know he is safe and will be here shortly; he is close athand and cannot remain away from home much longer; nevertheless I willconfirm my words with an oath, and call Jove who is the first andmightiest of all gods to witness, as also that hearth of Ulysses towhich I have now come, that all I have spoken shall surely come topass. Ulysses will return in this self same year; with the end of thismoon and the beginning of the next he will be here."
3.  "My dear child," answered Euryclea, "I am not mocking you. It isquite true as I tell you that Ulysses is come home again. He was thestranger whom they all kept on treating so badly in the cloister.Telemachus knew all the time that he was come back, but kept hisfather's secret that he might have his revenge on all these wickedpeople.
4.  As he spoke day began to break, and Menelaus, who had already risen,leaving Helen in bed, came towards them. When Telemachus saw him heput on his shirt as fast as he could, threw a great cloak over hisshoulders, and went out to meet him. "Menelaus," said he, "let me goback now to my own country, for I want to get home."
5.  "May it be even so," answered Penelope; "if your words come true youshall have such gifts and such good will from me that all who seeyou shall congratulate you; but I know very well how it will be.Ulysses will not return, neither will you get your escort hence, forso surely as that Ulysses ever was, there are now no longer any suchmasters in the house as he was, to receive honourable strangers orto further them on their way home. And now, you maids, wash his feetfor him, and make him a bed on a couch with rugs and blankets, that hemay be warm and quiet till morning. Then, at day break wash him andanoint him again, that he may sit in the cloister and take his mealswith Telemachus. It shall be the worse for any one of these hatefulpeople who is uncivil to him; like it or not, he shall have no more todo in this house. For how, sir, shall you be able to learn whetheror no I am superior to others of my sex both in goodness of heartand understanding, if I let you dine in my cloisters squalid and illclad? Men live but for a little season; if they are hard, and dealhardly, people wish them ill so long as they are alive, and speakcontemptuously of them when they are dead, but he that is righteousand deals righteously, the people tell of his praise among alllands, and many shall call him blessed."
6.  With these words he picked up the sword that Agelaus had droppedwhen he was being killed, and which was lying upon the ground. Then hestruck Leiodes on the back of his neck, so that his head fellrolling in the dust while he was yet speaking.

推荐功能

1.  This frightened Irus still more, but they brought him into themiddle of the court, and the two men raised their hands to fight. ThenUlysses considered whether he should let drive so hard at him as tomake an end of him then and there, or whether he should give him alighter blow that should only knock him down; in the end he deemedit best to give the lighter blow for fear the Achaeans should begin tosuspect who he was. Then they began to fight, and Irus hit Ulysseson the right shoulder; but Ulysses gave Irus a blow on the neckunder the ear that broke in the bones of his skull, and the blood camegushing out of his mouth; he fell groaning in the dust, gnashing histeeth and kicking on the ground, but the suitors threw up theirhands and nearly died of laughter, as Ulysses caught hold of him bythe foot and dragged him into the outer court as far as thegate-house. There he propped him up against the wall and put his staffin his hands. "Sit here," said he, "and keep the dogs and pigs off;you are a pitiful creature, and if you try to make yourself king ofthe beggars any more you shall fare still worse."
2.  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "Eat, my good fellow, andenjoy your supper, such as it is. God grants this, and withholds that,just as he thinks right, for he can do whatever he chooses."
3.  "Dogs, did you think that I should not come back from Troy? You havewasted my substance, have forced my women servants to lie with you,and have wooed my wife while I was still living. You have fearedneither Cod nor man, and now you shall die."
4.  Alcinous then led the way, and the others followed after, while aservant went to fetch Demodocus. The fifty-two picked oarsmen wentto the sea shore as they had been told, and when they got there theydrew the ship into the water, got her mast and sails inside her, boundthe oars to the thole-pins with twisted thongs of leather, all indue course, and spread the white sails aloft. They moored the vessel alittle way out from land, and then came on shore and went to the houseof King Alcinous. The outhouses, yards, and all the precincts werefilled with crowds of men in great multitudes both old and young;and Alcinous killed them a dozen sheep, eight full grown pigs, and twooxen. These they skinned and dressed so as to provide a magnificentbanquet.
5.   "What an exquisitely delicious sleep I have been having," saidshe, as she passed her hands over her face, "in spite of all mymisery. I wish Diana would let me die so sweetly now at this verymoment, that I might no longer waste in despair for the loss of mydear husband, who possessed every kind of good quality and was themost distinguished man among the Achaeans."
6.  As he said this Euryclea left the cloister to fetch some more water,for the first had been all spilt; and when she had washed him andanointed him with oil, Ulysses drew his seat nearer to the fire towarm himself, and hid the scar under his rags. Then Penelope begantalking to him and said:

应用

1.  "If you are Ulysses," said he, "then what you have said is just.We have done much wrong on your lands and in your house. ButAntinous who was the head and front of the offending lies low already.It was all his doing. It was not that he wanted to marry Penelope;he did not so much care about that; what he wanted was something quitedifferent, and Jove has not vouchsafed it to him; he wanted to killyour son and to be chief man in Ithaca. Now, therefore, that he hasmet the death which was his due, spare the lives of your people. Wewill make everything good among ourselves, and pay you in full for allthat we have eaten and drunk. Each one of us shall pay you a fineworth twenty oxen, and we will keep on giving you gold and bronze tillyour heart is softened. Until we have done this no one can complain ofyour being enraged against us."
2.  Thus he chided with his heart, and checked it into endurance, but hetossed about as one who turns a paunch full of blood and fat infront of a hot fire, doing it first on one side and then on the other,that he may get it cooked as soon as possible, even so did he turnhimself about from side to side, thinking all the time how, singlehanded as he was, he should contrive to kill so large a body of men asthe wicked suitors. But by and by Minerva came down from heaven in thelikeness of a woman, and hovered over his head saying, "My poorunhappy man, why do you lie awake in this way? This is your house:your wife is safe inside it, and so is your son who is just such ayoung man as any father may be proud of."
3.  "Here we entered, but so dark was the night that some god musthave brought us in, for there was nothing whatever to be seen. A thickmist hung all round our ships; the moon was hidden behind a mass ofclouds so that no one could have seen the island if he had lookedfor it, nor were there any breakers to tell us we were close inshore before we found ourselves upon the land itself; when, however,we had beached the ships, we took down the sails, went ashore andcamped upon the beach till daybreak.
4、  "Here she ended, and dawn enthroned in gold began to show in heaven,whereon she returned inland. I then went on board and told my men toloose the ship from her moorings; so they at once got into her, tooktheir places, and began to smite the grey sea with their oars.Presently the great and cunning goddess Circe befriended us with afair wind that blew dead aft, and stayed steadily with us, keeping oursails well filled, so we did whatever wanted doing to the ship's gear,and let her go as wind and helmsman headed her.
5、  On this Asphalion, one of the servants, poured water over theirhands and they laid their hands on the good things that were beforethem.

旧版特色

!

网友评论(KSF5ZipN43447))

  • 阿尔维斯 08-11

      "'Stay where you are, then, 'answered I, 'eating and drinking at theship, but I must go, for I am most urgently bound to do so.'

  • 孙义珍 08-11

      As he spoke he crossed the threshold, and Alcinous sent a man toconduct him to his ship and to the sea shore. Arete also sent somemaid servants with him- one with a clean shirt and cloak, another tocarry his strong-box, and a third with corn and wine. When they got tothe water side the crew took these things and put them on board,with all the meat and drink; but for Ulysses they spread a rug and alinen sheet on deck that he might sleep soundly in the stern of theship. Then he too went on board and lay down without a word, but thecrew took every man his place and loosed the hawser from the piercedstone to which it had been bound. Thereon, when they began rowingout to sea, Ulysses fell into a deep, sweet, and almost deathlikeslumber.

  • 罗斯海 08-11

       "So I drew back, and sheathed my sword, whereon when he had drank ofthe blood he began with his prophecy.

  • 丹尼斯·伍德赛德 08-11

      When he had said this, he seated himself beside Alcinous. Supper wasthen served, and the wine was mixed for drinking. A servant led in thefavourite bard Demodocus, and set him in the midst of the company,near one of the bearing-posts supporting the cloister, that he mightlean against it. Then Ulysses cut off a piece of roast pork withplenty of fat (for there was abundance left on the joint) and saidto a servant, "Take this piece of pork over to Demodocus and tellhim to eat it; for all the pain his lays may cause me I will salutehim none the less; bards are honoured and respected throughout theworld, for the muse teaches them their songs and loves them."

  • 赵锦飞 08-10

    {  "My dear wife," replied Menelaus, "I see the likeness just as youdo. His hands and feet are just like Ulysses'; so is his hair, withthe shape of his head and the expression of his eyes. Moreover, when Iwas talking about Ulysses, and saying how much he had suffered on myaccount, tears fell from his eyes, and he hid his face in his mantle."

  • 崔颖秋 08-09

      "Nausicaa, what can your mother have been about, to have such a lazydaughter? Here are your clothes all lying in disorder, yet you aregoing to be married almost immediately, and should not only be welldressed yourself, but should find good clothes for those who attendyou. This is the way to get yourself a good name, and to make yourfather and mother proud of you. Suppose, then, that we make tomorrow awashing day, and start at daybreak. I will come and help you so thatyou may have everything ready as soon as possible, for all the bestyoung men among your own people are courting you, and you are notgoing to remain a maid much longer. Ask your father, therefore, tohave a waggon and mules ready for us at daybreak, to take the rugs,robes, and girdles; and you can ride, too, which will be muchpleasanter for you than walking, for the washing-cisterns are some wayfrom the town."}

  • 吴如雄 08-09

      "'This,' I answered, 'must be as it may please heaven, but tell meand tell me and tell me true, I see my poor mother's ghost close byus; she is sitting by the blood without saying a word, and though I amher own son she does not remember me and speak to me; tell me, Sir,how I can make her know me.'

  • 伊福普 08-09

      Thus did Ulysses sleep, and the young men slept beside him. Butthe swineherd did not like sleeping away from his pigs, so he gotready to go and Ulysses was glad to see that he looked after hisproperty during his master's absence. First he slung his sword overhis brawny shoulders and put on a thick cloak to keep out the wind. Healso took the skin of a large and well fed goat, and a javelin in caseof attack from men or dogs. Thus equipped he went to his rest wherethe pigs were camping under an overhanging rock that gave them shelterfrom the North wind.

  • 林永清 08-08

       Now Venus was just come in from a visit to her father Jove, andwas about sitting down when Mars came inside the house, an said ashe took her hand in his own, "Let us go to the couch of Vulcan: heis not at home, but is gone off to Lemnos among the Sintians, whosespeech is barbarous."

  • 叶春为 08-06

    {  And Ulysses answered, "A man, goddess, may know a great deal, butyou are so constantly changing your appearance that when he meetsyou it is a hard matter for him to know whether it is you or not. Thismuch, however, I know exceedingly well; you were very kind to me aslong as we Achaeans were fighting before Troy, but from the day onwhich we went on board ship after having sacked the city of Priam, andheaven dispersed us- from that day, Minerva, I saw no more of you, andcannot ever remember your coming to my ship to help me in adifficulty; I had to wander on sick and sorry till the godsdelivered me from evil and I reached the city of the Phaeacians, whereyou encouraged me and took me into the town. And now, I beseech you inyour father's name, tell me the truth, for I do not believe I amreally back in Ithaca. I am in some other country and you aremocking me and deceiving me in all you have been saying. Tell methen truly, have I really got back to my own country?"

  • 韦林 08-06

      Then the other maids in the house rose and lit the fire on thehearth; Telemachus also rose and put on his clothes. He girded hissword about his shoulder, bound his sandals on his comely feet, andtook a doughty spear with a point of sharpened bronze; then he went tothe threshold of the cloister and said to Euryclea, "Nurse, did youmake the stranger comfortable both as regards bed and board, or didyou let him shift for himself?- for my mother, good woman though sheis, has a way of paying great attention to second-rate people, andof neglecting others who are in reality much better men."

提交评论