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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:吴臻 大小:ofk2qctI85326KB 下载:C6JAS9h574421次
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日期:2020-08-07 23:25:43
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  To this Telemachus answered, "By Jove, Agelaus, and by the sorrowsof my unhappy father, who has either perished far from Ithaca, or iswandering in some distant land, I throw no obstacles in the way ofmy mother's marriage; on the contrary I urge her to choosewhomsoever she will, and I will give her numberless gifts into thebargain, but I dare not insist point blank that she shall leave thehouse against her own wishes. Heaven forbid that I should do this."
2.  This frightened Irus still more, but they brought him into themiddle of the court, and the two men raised their hands to fight. ThenUlysses considered whether he should let drive so hard at him as tomake an end of him then and there, or whether he should give him alighter blow that should only knock him down; in the end he deemedit best to give the lighter blow for fear the Achaeans should begin tosuspect who he was. Then they began to fight, and Irus hit Ulysseson the right shoulder; but Ulysses gave Irus a blow on the neckunder the ear that broke in the bones of his skull, and the blood camegushing out of his mouth; he fell groaning in the dust, gnashing histeeth and kicking on the ground, but the suitors threw up theirhands and nearly died of laughter, as Ulysses caught hold of him bythe foot and dragged him into the outer court as far as thegate-house. There he propped him up against the wall and put his staffin his hands. "Sit here," said he, "and keep the dogs and pigs off;you are a pitiful creature, and if you try to make yourself king ofthe beggars any more you shall fare still worse."
3.  "'Son of Atreus,' he answered, 'why ask me? You had better notknow what I can tell you, for your eyes will surely fill when you haveheard my story. Many of those about whom you ask are dead and gone,but many still remain, and only two of the chief men among theAchaeans perished during their return home. As for what happened onthe field of battle- you were there yourself. A third Achaean leaderis still at sea, alive, but hindered from returning. Ajax was wrecked,for Neptune drove him on to the great rocks of Gyrae; nevertheless, helet him get safe out of the water, and in spite of all Minerva'shatred he would have escaped death, if he had not ruined himself byboasting. He said the gods could not drown him even though they hadtried to do so, and when Neptune heard this large talk, he seizedhis trident in his two brawny hands, and split the rock of Gyrae intwo pieces. The base remained where it was, but the part on which Ajaxwas sitting fell headlong into the sea and carried Ajax with it; so hedrank salt water and was drowned.
4.  "My poor good man," said she, "why is Neptune so furiously angrywith you? He is giving you a great deal of trouble, but for all hisbluster he will not kill you. You seem to be a sensible person, dothen as I bid you; strip, leave your raft to drive before the wind,and swim to the Phaecian coast where better luck awaits you. And here,take my veil and put it round your chest; it is enchanted, and you cancome to no harm so long as you wear it. As soon as you touch land takeit off, throw it back as far as you can into the sea, and then go awayagain." With these words she took off her veil and gave it him. Thenshe dived down again like a sea-gull and vanished beneath the darkblue waters.
5.  "These men hatched a plot against me that would have reduced me tothe very extreme of misery, for when the ship had got some way outfrom land they resolved on selling me as a slave. They stripped meof the shirt and cloak that I was wearing, and gave me instead thetattered old clouts in which you now see me; then, towardsnightfall, they reached the tilled lands of Ithaca, and there theybound me with a strong rope fast in the ship, while they went on shoreto get supper by the sea side. But the gods soon undid my bonds forme, and having drawn my rags over my head I slid down the rudderinto the sea, where I struck out and swam till I was well clear ofthem, and came ashore near a thick wood in which I lay concealed. Theywere very angry at my having escaped and went searching about forme, till at last they thought it was no further use and went back totheir ship. The gods, having hidden me thus easily, then took me toa good man's door- for it seems that I am not to die yet awhile."
6.  "My dear child," answered Euryclea, "I am not mocking you. It isquite true as I tell you that Ulysses is come home again. He was thestranger whom they all kept on treating so badly in the cloister.Telemachus knew all the time that he was come back, but kept hisfather's secret that he might have his revenge on all these wickedpeople.

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1.  "What do you think of this man, O Phaecians? Is he not tall and goodlooking, and is he not Clever? True, he is my own guest, but all ofyou share in the distinction. Do not he a hurry to send him away,nor niggardly in the presents you make to one who is in such greatneed, for heaven has blessed all of you with great abundance."
2.  "Nausicaa, what can your mother have been about, to have such a lazydaughter? Here are your clothes all lying in disorder, yet you aregoing to be married almost immediately, and should not only be welldressed yourself, but should find good clothes for those who attendyou. This is the way to get yourself a good name, and to make yourfather and mother proud of you. Suppose, then, that we make tomorrow awashing day, and start at daybreak. I will come and help you so thatyou may have everything ready as soon as possible, for all the bestyoung men among your own people are courting you, and you are notgoing to remain a maid much longer. Ask your father, therefore, tohave a waggon and mules ready for us at daybreak, to take the rugs,robes, and girdles; and you can ride, too, which will be muchpleasanter for you than walking, for the washing-cisterns are some wayfrom the town."
3.  "My good nurse," answered Penelope, "you must be mad. The godssometimes send some very sensible people out of their minds, andmake foolish people become sensible. This is what they must havebeen doing to you; for you always used to be a reasonable person.Why should you thus mock me when I have trouble enough already-talking such nonsense, and waking me up out of a sweet sleep thathad taken possession of my eyes and closed them? I have never slept sosoundly from the day my poor husband went to that city with theill-omened name. Go back again into the women's room; if it had beenany one else, who had woke me up to bring me such absurd news I shouldhave sent her away with a severe scolding. As it is, your age shallprotect you."
4.  "Fountain nymphs," he cried, "children of Jove, if ever Ulyssesburned you thigh bones covered with fat whether of lambs or kids,grant my prayer that heaven may send him home. He would soon put anend to the swaggering threats with which such men as you go aboutinsulting people-gadding all over the town while your flocks are goingto ruin through bad shepherding."
5.  "You are always taking something of that sort into your head,"replied Minerva, "and that is why I cannot desert you in yourafflictions; you are so plausible, shrewd and shifty. Any one butyourself on returning from so long a voyage would at once have gonehome to see his wife and children, but you do not seem to care aboutasking after them or hearing any news about them till you haveexploited your wife, who remains at home vainly grieving for you,and having no peace night or day for the tears she sheds on yourbehalf. As for my not coming near you, I was never uneasy about you,for I was certain you would get back safely though you would loseall your men, and I did not wish to quarrel with my uncle Neptune, whonever forgave you for having blinded his son. I will now, however,point out to you the lie of the land, and you will then perhapsbelieve me. This is the haven of the old merman Phorcys, and here isthe olive tree that grows at the head of it; [near it is the cavesacred to the Naiads;] here too is the overarching cavern in which youhave offered many an acceptable hecatomb to the nymphs, and this isthe wooded mountain Neritum."
6.  "Leiodes, what are you talking about? Your words are monstrous andintolerable; it makes me angry to listen to you. Shall, then, this bowtake the life of many a chief among us, merely because you cannot bendit yourself? True, you were not born to be an archer, but there areothers who will soon string it."

推荐功能

1.  "The men when they got on shore followed a level road by which thepeople draw their firewood from the mountains into the town, tillpresently they met a young woman who had come outside to fetchwater, and who was daughter to a Laestrygonian named Antiphates. Shewas going to the fountain Artacia from which the people bring in theirwater, and when my men had come close up to her, they asked her whothe king of that country might be, and over what kind of people heruled; so she directed them to her father's house, but when they gotthere they found his wife to be a giantess as huge as a mountain,and they were horrified at the sight of her.
2.  "Thus did they speak and I assented. Thereon through the livelongday to the going down of the sun we feasted our fill on meat and wine,but when the sun went down and it came on dark the men laid themselvesdown to sleep in the covered cloisters. I, however, after I had gotinto bed with Circe, besought her by her knees, and the goddesslistened to what I had got to say. 'Circe,' said I, 'please to keepthe promise you made me about furthering me on my homeward voyage. Iwant to get back and so do my men, they are always pestering me withtheir complaints as soon as ever your back is turned.'
3.  Penelope answered, "My son, I am so lost in astonishment that Ican find no words in which either to ask questions or to answerthem. I cannot even look him straight in the face. Still, if he reallyis Ulysses come back to his own home again, we shall get to understandone another better by and by, for there are tokens with which we twoare alone acquainted, and which are hidden from all others."
4.  And Minerva said, "There is no fear of your race dying out yet,while Penelope has such a fine son as you are. But tell me, and tellme true, what is the meaning of all this feasting, and who are thesepeople? What is it all about? Have you some banquet, or is there awedding in the family- for no one seems to be bringing anyprovisions of his own? And the guests- how atrociously they arebehaving; what riot they make over the whole house; it is enough todisgust any respectable person who comes near them."
5.   But Neptune did not forget the threats with which he had alreadythreatened Ulysses, so he took counsel with Jove. "Father Jove,"said he, "I shall no longer be held in any sort of respect among yougods, if mortals like the Phaeacians, who are my own flesh andblood, show such small regard for me. I said I would Ulysses gethome when he had suffered sufficiently. I did not say that he shouldnever get home at all, for I knew you had already nodded your headabout it, and promised that he should do so; but now they have broughthim in a ship fast asleep and have landed him in Ithaca afterloading him with more magnificent presents of bronze, gold, andraiment than he would ever have brought back from Troy, if he hadhad his share of the spoil and got home without misadventure."
6.  BOOK XVIII.

应用

1.  Thus conversing the two made their way towards the house. Whenthey got there they found Telemachus with the stockman and theswineherd cutting up meat and mixing wine with water. Then the oldSicel woman took Laertes inside and washed him and anointed him withoil. She put him on a good cloak, and Minerva came up to him andgave him a more imposing presence, making him taller and stouterthan before. When he came back his son was surprised to see himlooking so like an immortal, and said to him, "My dear father, someone of the gods has been making you much taller and better-looking."
2.  Penelope heard what he was saying and scolded the maid, "Impudentbaggage, said she, "I see how abominably you are behaving, and youshall smart for it. You knew perfectly well, for I told you myself,that I was going to see the stranger and ask him about my husband, forwhose sake I am in such continual sorrow."
3.  And Minerva said, "There is no fear of your race dying out yet,while Penelope has such a fine son as you are. But tell me, and tellme true, what is the meaning of all this feasting, and who are thesepeople? What is it all about? Have you some banquet, or is there awedding in the family- for no one seems to be bringing anyprovisions of his own? And the guests- how atrociously they arebehaving; what riot they make over the whole house; it is enough todisgust any respectable person who comes near them."
4、  "I stayed there for seven years and got together much money amongthe Egyptians, for they all gave me something; but when it was nowgoing on for eight years there came a certain Phoenician, a cunningrascal, who had already committed all sorts of villainy, and thisman talked me over into going with him to Phoenicia, where his houseand his possessions lay. I stayed there for a whole twelve months, butat the end of that time when months and days had gone by till the sameseason had come round again, he set me on board a ship bound forLibya, on a pretence that I was to take a cargo along with him to thatplace, but really that he might sell me as a slave and take themoney I fetched. I suspected his intention, but went on board withhim, for I could not help it.
5、  MINERVA now put it in Penelope's mind to make the suitors trytheir skill with the bow and with the iron axes, in contest amongthemselves, as a means of bringing about their destruction. She wentupstairs and got the store room key, which was made of bronze andhad a handle of ivory; she then went with her maidens into the storeroom at the end of the house, where her husband's treasures of gold,bronze, and wrought iron were kept, and where was also his bow, andthe quiver full of deadly arrows that had been given him by a friendwhom he had met in Lacedaemon- Iphitus the son of Eurytus. The twofell in with one another in Messene at the house of Ortilochus,where Ulysses was staying in order to recover a debt that was owingfrom the whole people; for the Messenians had carried off threehundred sheep from Ithaca, and had sailed away with them and withtheir shepherds. In quest of these Ulysses took a long journey whilestill quite young, for his father and the other chieftains sent him ona mission to recover them. Iphitus had gone there also to try andget back twelve brood mares that he had lost, and the mule foalsthat were running with them. These mares were the death of him inthe end, for when he went to the house of Jove's son, mighty Hercules,who performed such prodigies of valour, Hercules to his shame killedhim, though he was his guest, for he feared not heaven's vengeance,nor yet respected his own table which he had set before Iphitus, butkilled him in spite of everything, and kept the mares himself. Itwas when claiming these that Iphitus met Ulysses, and gave him the bowwhich mighty Eurytus had been used to carry, and which on his deathhad been left by him to his son. Ulysses gave him in return a swordand a spear, and this was the beginning of a fast friendship, althoughthey never visited at one another's houses, for Jove's son Herculeskilled Iphitus ere they could do so. This bow, then, given him byIphitus, had not been taken with him by Ulysses when he sailed forTroy; he had used it so long as he had been at home, but had left itbehind as having been a keepsake from a valued friend.

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  • 李伟华 08-06

      "Fountain nymphs," he cried, "children of Jove, if ever Ulyssesburned you thigh bones covered with fat whether of lambs or kids,grant my prayer that heaven may send him home. He would soon put anend to the swaggering threats with which such men as you go aboutinsulting people-gadding all over the town while your flocks are goingto ruin through bad shepherding."

  • 京天东 08-06

      On this he aimed a deadly arrow at Antinous, who was about to takeup a two-handled gold cup to drink his wine and already had it inhis hands. He had no thought of death- who amongst all the revellerswould think that one man, however brave, would stand alone among somany and kill him? The arrow struck Antinous in the throat, and thepoint went clean through his neck, so that he fell over and the cupdropped from his hand, while a thick stream of blood gushed from hisnostrils. He kicked the table from him and upset the things on it,so that the bread and roasted meats were all soiled as they fellover on to the ground. The suitors were in an uproar when they sawthat a man had been hit; they sprang in dismay one and all of themfrom their seats and looked everywhere towards the walls, but therewas neither shield nor spear, and they rebuked Ulysses very angrily."Stranger," said they, "you shall pay for shooting people in this way:om yi you shall see no other contest; you are a doomed man; he whomyou have slain was the foremost youth in Ithaca, and the vulturesshall devour you for having killed him."

  • 杨众英 08-06

       On this they rose and went to the water side. The crew then drew theship on shore; their servants took their armour from them, and theywent up in a body to the place of assembly, but they would not let anyone old or young sit along with them, and Antinous, son ofEupeithes, spoke first.

  • 许子伟 08-06

      On this he put the bow down, letting it lean against the door[that led into the house] with the arrow standing against the top ofthe bow. Then he sat down on the seat from which he had risen, andAntinous said:

  • 韩赵魏 08-05

    {  Meanwhile the daughter of Icarius, wise Penelope, had had had a richseat placed for her facing the court and cloisters, so that shecould hear what every one was saying. The dinner indeed had beenprepared amid merriment; it had been both good and abundant, forthey had sacrificed many victims; but the supper was yet to come,and nothing can be conceived more gruesome than the meal which agoddess and a brave man were soon to lay before them- for they hadbrought their doom upon themselves.

  • 马蒂森 08-04

      BOOK V.}

  • 付春燕 08-04

      When Eumaeus heard this he went straight to Ulysses and said,"Father stranger, my mistress Penelope, mother of Telemachus, has sentfor you; she is in great grief, but she wishes to hear anything youcan tell her about her husband, and if she is satisfied that you arespeaking the truth, she will give you a shirt and cloak, which are thevery things that you are most in want of. As for bread, you can getenough of that to fill your belly, by begging about the town, andletting those give that will."

  • 束焕 08-04

      "These men hatched a plot against me that would have reduced me tothe very extreme of misery, for when the ship had got some way outfrom land they resolved on selling me as a slave. They stripped meof the shirt and cloak that I was wearing, and gave me instead thetattered old clouts in which you now see me; then, towardsnightfall, they reached the tilled lands of Ithaca, and there theybound me with a strong rope fast in the ship, while they went on shoreto get supper by the sea side. But the gods soon undid my bonds forme, and having drawn my rags over my head I slid down the rudderinto the sea, where I struck out and swam till I was well clear ofthem, and came ashore near a thick wood in which I lay concealed. Theywere very angry at my having escaped and went searching about forme, till at last they thought it was no further use and went back totheir ship. The gods, having hidden me thus easily, then took me toa good man's door- for it seems that I am not to die yet awhile."

  • 梁勇贞 08-03

       "Telemachus, I shall go upstairs and lie down on that sad couch,which I have not ceased to water with my tears, from the day Ulyssesset out for Troy with the sons of Atreus. You failed, however, to makeit clear to me before the suitors came back to the house, whether orno you had been able to hear anything about the return of yourfather."

  • 曹德伟 08-01

    {  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "Old man, you willneither get paid for bringing good news, nor will Ulysses ever comehome; drink you wine in peace, and let us talk about something else.Do not keep on reminding me of all this; it always pains me when anyone speaks about my honoured master. As for your oath we will let italone, but I only wish he may come, as do Penelope, his old fatherLaertes, and his son Telemachus. I am terribly unhappy too aboutthis same boy of his; he was running up fast into manhood, and badefare to be no worse man, face and figure, than his father, but someone, either god or man, has been unsettling his mind, so he has goneoff to Pylos to try and get news of his father, and the suitors arelying in wait for him as he is coming home, in the hope of leaving thehouse of Arceisius without a name in Ithaca. But let us say no moreabout him, and leave him to be taken, or else to escape if the sonof Saturn holds his hand over him to protect him. And now, old man,tell me your own story; tell me also, for I want to know, who youare and where you come from. Tell me of your town and parents, whatmanner of ship you came in, how crew brought you to Ithaca, and fromwhat country they professed to come- for you cannot have come byland."

  • 小丹 08-01

      Then was Ulysses glad and prayed aloud saying, "Father Jove, grantthat Alcinous may do all as he has said, for so he will win animperishable name among mankind, and at the same time I shall returnto my country."

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