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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:孙巍 大小:hmpNW8OF89309KB 下载:OfKZTy0564311次
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日期:2020-08-10 19:13:49
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  On this she came down from her upper room, and while doing so sheconsidered whether she should keep at a distance from her husbandand question him, or whether she should at once go up to him andembrace him. When, however, she had crossed the stone floor of thecloister, she sat down opposite Ulysses by the fire, against thewall at right angles [to that by which she had entered], while Ulyssessat near one of the bearing-posts, looking upon the ground, andwaiting to see what his wife would say to him when she saw him. Fora long time she sat silent and as one lost in amazement. At one momentshe looked him full in the face, but then again directly, she wasmisled by his shabby clothes and failed to recognize him, tillTelemachus began to reproach her and said:
2.  And Ulysses answered, "A man, goddess, may know a great deal, butyou are so constantly changing your appearance that when he meetsyou it is a hard matter for him to know whether it is you or not. Thismuch, however, I know exceedingly well; you were very kind to me aslong as we Achaeans were fighting before Troy, but from the day onwhich we went on board ship after having sacked the city of Priam, andheaven dispersed us- from that day, Minerva, I saw no more of you, andcannot ever remember your coming to my ship to help me in adifficulty; I had to wander on sick and sorry till the godsdelivered me from evil and I reached the city of the Phaeacians, whereyou encouraged me and took me into the town. And now, I beseech you inyour father's name, tell me the truth, for I do not believe I amreally back in Ithaca. I am in some other country and you aremocking me and deceiving me in all you have been saying. Tell methen truly, have I really got back to my own country?"
3.  BOOK XXI.
4.  Laertes was delighted when he heard this. "Good heavens, heexclaimed, "what a day I am enjoying: I do indeed rejoice at it. Myson and grandson are vying with one another in the matter of valour."
5.  This was how they talked. But Telemachus went down into the loftyand spacious store-room where his father's treasure of gold and bronzelay heaped up upon the floor, and where the linen and spare clotheswere kept in open chests. Here, too, there was a store of fragrantolive oil, while casks of old, well-ripened wine, unblended and fitfor a god to drink, were ranged against the wall in case Ulyssesshould come home again after all. The room was closed with well-madedoors opening in the middle; moreover the faithful old house-keeperEuryclea, daughter of Ops the son of Pisenor, was in charge ofeverything both night and day. Telemachus called her to the store-roomand said:
6.  On this pale fear seized every one; they were so frightened thattheir arms dropped from their hands and fell upon the ground at thesound of the goddess's voice, and they fled back to the city for theirlives. But Ulysses gave a great cry, and gathering himself togetherswooped down like a soaring eagle. Then the son of Saturn sent athunderbolt of fire that fell just in front of Minerva, so she said toUlysses, "Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, stop this warful strife, orJove will be angry with you."

计划指导

1.  "Old man," answered Ulysses, "she knows already, so you need nottrouble about that." On this he took his seat, and the sons ofDolius gathered round Ulysses to give him greeting and embrace him oneafter the other; then they took their seats in due order near Doliustheir father.
2.  "'You will now come to the Thrinacian island, and here you willsee many herds of cattle and flocks of sheep belonging to the sun-god-seven herds of cattle and seven flocks of sheep, with fifty head ineach flock. They do not breed, nor do they become fewer in number, andthey are tended by the goddesses Phaethusa and Lampetie, who arechildren of the sun-god Hyperion by Neaera. Their mother when shehad borne them and had done suckling them sent them to theThrinacian island, which was a long way off, to live there and lookafter their father's flocks and herds. If you leave these flocksunharmed, and think of nothing but getting home, you may yet aftermuch hardship reach Ithaca; but if you harm them, then I forewarnyou of the destruction both of your ship and of your comrades; andeven though you may yourself escape, you will return late, in badplight, after losing all your men.'
3.  "You want to know,' said he, 'about your return home, but heavenwill make this hard for you. I do not think that you will escape theeye of Neptune, who still nurses his bitter grudge against you forhaving blinded his son. Still, after much suffering you may get homeif you can restrain yourself and your companions when your shipreaches the Thrinacian island, where you will find the sheep andcattle belonging to the sun, who sees and gives ear to everything.If you leave these flocks unharmed and think of nothing but of gettinghome, you may yet after much hardship reach Ithaca; but if you harmthem, then I forewarn you of the destruction both of your ship andof your men. Even though you may yourself escape, you will return inbad plight after losing all your men, [in another man's ship, andyou will find trouble in your house, which will be overrun byhigh-handed people, who are devouring your substance under the pretextof paying court and making presents to your wife.
4.  "When we reached it we went ashore to take in water, and dinedhard by the ships. Immediately after dinner I took a herald and one ofmy men and went straight to the house of Aeolus, where I found himfeasting with his wife and family; so we sat down as suppliants on thethreshold. They were astounded when they saw us and said, 'Ulysses,what brings you here? What god has been ill-treating you? We tookgreat pains to further you on your way home to Ithaca, or whereverit was that you wanted to go to.'
5.  "I did not think of asking about that," replied Eumaeus, "when I wasin the town. I thought I would give my message and come back as soonas I could. I met a man sent by those who had gone with you toPylos, and he was the first to tell the new your mother, but I can saywhat I saw with my own eyes; I had just got on to the crest of thehill of Mercury above the town when I saw a ship coming into harbourwith a number of men in her. They had many shields and spears, and Ithought it was the suitors, but I cannot be sure."
6.  Leiodes then caught the knees of Ulysses and said, "Ulysses Ibeseech you have mercy upon me and spare me. I never wronged any ofthe women in your house either in word or deed, and I tried to stopthe others. I saw them, but they would not listen, and now they arepaying for their folly. I was their sacrificing priest; if you killme, I shall die without having done anything to deserve it, andshall have got no thanks for all the good that I did."

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1.  On this Telemachus came forward and said, "Sirs, are you mad? Canyou not carry your meat and your liquor decently? Some evil spirit haspossessed you. I do not wish to drive any of you away, but you havehad your suppers, and the sooner you all go home to bed the better."
2.  His son, Theoclymenus, it was who now came up to Telemachus as hewas making drink-offerings and praying in his ship. "Friend'" said he,"now that I find you sacrificing in this place, I beseech you byyour sacrifices themselves, and by the god to whom you make them, Ipray you also by your own head and by those of your followers, tell methe truth and nothing but the truth. Who and whence are you? Tell mealso of your town and parents."
3.  "More's the pity," answered Telemachus, "I am sorry for him, butwe must leave him to himself just now. If people could have everythingtheir own way, the first thing I should choose would be the returnof my father; but go, and give your message; then make haste backagain, and do not turn out of your way to tell Laertes. Tell my motherto send one of her women secretly with the news at once, and let himhear it from her."
4.  This was what he said, but all the time he was expecting to beable to string the bow and shoot through the iron, whereas in facthe was to be the first that should taste of the arrows from thehands of Ulysses, whom he was dishonouring in his own house- eggingthe others on to do so also.
5.   This was what they said, but they did not know what it was thathad been happening. The upper servant Eurynome washed and anointedUlysses in his own house and gave him a shirt and cloak, while Minervamade him look taller and stronger than before; she also made thehair grow thick on the top of his head, and flow down in curls likehyacinth blossoms; she glorified him about the head and shoulders justas a skilful workman who has studied art of all kinds under Vulcanor Minerva- and his work is full of beauty- enriches a piece of silverplate by gilding it. He came from the bath looking like one of theimmortals, and sat down opposite his wife on the seat he had left. "Mydear," said he, "heaven has endowed you with a heart more unyieldingthan woman ever yet had. No other woman could bear to keep away fromher husband when he had come back to her after twenty years ofabsence, and after having gone through so much. But come, nurse, get abed ready for me; I will sleep alone, for this woman has a heart ashard as iron."
6.  "These two," continued Ulysses, "will not keep long out of the fray,when the suitors and we join fight in my house. Now, therefore, returnhome early to-morrow morning, and go about among the suitors asbefore. Later on the swineherd will bring me to the city disguisedas a miserable old beggar. If you see them ill-treating me, steel yourheart against my sufferings; even though they drag me feet foremostout of the house, or throw things at me, look on and do nothing beyondgently trying to make them behave more reasonably; but they will notlisten to you, for the day of their reckoning is at hand.Furthermore I say, and lay my saying to your heart, when Minerva shallput it in my mind, I will nod my head to you, and on seeing me do thisyou must collect all the armour that is in the house and hide it inthe strong store room. Make some excuse when the suitors ask you whyyou are removing it; say that you have taken it to be out of the wayof the smoke, inasmuch as it is no longer what it was when Ulysseswent away, but has become soiled and begrimed with soot. Add to thismore particularly that you are afraid Jove may set them on toquarrel over their wine, and that they may do each other some harmwhich may disgrace both banquet and wooing, for the sight of armssometimes tempts people to use them. But leave a sword and a spearapiece for yourself and me, and a couple oxhide shields so that we cansnatch them up at any moment; Jove and Minerva will then soon quietthese people. There is also another matter; if you are indeed my sonand my blood runs in your veins, let no one know that Ulysses iswithin the house- neither Laertes, nor yet the swineherd, nor any ofthe servants, nor even Penelope herself. Let you and me exploit thewomen alone, and let us also make trial of some other of the menservants, to see who is on our side and whose hand is against us."

应用

1.  "'Look here, Cyclops,' said I, you have been eating a great dealof man's flesh, so take this and drink some wine, that you may seewhat kind of liquor we had on board my ship. I was bringing it toyou as a drink-offering, in the hope that you would take compassionupon me and further me on my way home, whereas all you do is to goon ramping and raving most intolerably. You ought to be ashamedyourself; how can you expect people to come see you any more if youtreat them in this way?'
2.  "On this I took comfort in spite of all my sorrow, and said, 'Iknow, then, about these two; tell me, therefore, about the third manof whom you spoke; is he still alive, but at sea, and unable to gethome? or is he dead? Tell me, no matter how much it may grieve me.'
3.  With these words he led the way, and the others followed after. Aservant hung Demodocus's lyre on its peg for him, led him out of thecloister, and set him on the same way as that along which all thechief men of the Phaeacians were going to see the sports; a crowd ofseveral thousands of people followed them, and there were manyexcellent competitors for all the prizes. Acroneos, Ocyalus, Elatreus,Nauteus, Prymneus, Anchialus, Eretmeus, Ponteus, Proreus, Thoon,Anabesineus, and Amphialus son of Polyneus son of Tecton. There wasalso Euryalus son of Naubolus, who was like Mars himself, and wasthe best looking man among the Phaecians except Laodamas. Three sonsof Alcinous, Laodamas, Halios, and Clytoneus, competed also.
4、  On this he took his leave, and Calypso went out to look for Ulysses,for she had heard Jove's message. She found him sitting upon the beachwith his eyes ever filled with tears, and dying of sheerhome-sickness; for he had got tired of Calypso, and though he wasforced to sleep with her in the cave by night, it was she, not he,that would have it so. As for the day time, he spent it on the rocksand on the sea-shore, weeping, crying aloud for his despair, andalways looking out upon the sea. Calypso then went close up to himsaid:
5、  "May it be even so," answered Penelope; "if your words come true youshall have such gifts and such good will from me that all who seeyou shall congratulate you; but I know very well how it will be.Ulysses will not return, neither will you get your escort hence, forso surely as that Ulysses ever was, there are now no longer any suchmasters in the house as he was, to receive honourable strangers orto further them on their way home. And now, you maids, wash his feetfor him, and make him a bed on a couch with rugs and blankets, that hemay be warm and quiet till morning. Then, at day break wash him andanoint him again, that he may sit in the cloister and take his mealswith Telemachus. It shall be the worse for any one of these hatefulpeople who is uncivil to him; like it or not, he shall have no more todo in this house. For how, sir, shall you be able to learn whetheror no I am superior to others of my sex both in goodness of heartand understanding, if I let you dine in my cloisters squalid and illclad? Men live but for a little season; if they are hard, and dealhardly, people wish them ill so long as they are alive, and speakcontemptuously of them when they are dead, but he that is righteousand deals righteously, the people tell of his praise among alllands, and many shall call him blessed."

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  • 王德文 08-09

      On this he put the bow down, letting it lean against the door[that led into the house] with the arrow standing against the top ofthe bow. Then he sat down on the seat from which he had risen, andAntinous said:

  • 严丽梅 08-09

      So Eteoneus bustled back and bade other servants come with him. Theytook their sweating hands from under the yoke, made them fast to themangers, and gave them a feed of oats and barley mixed. Then theyleaned the chariot against the end wall of the courtyard, and ledthe way into the house. Telemachus and Pisistratus were astonishedwhen they saw it, for its splendour was as that of the sun and moon;then, when they had admired everything to their heart's content,they went into the bath room and washed themselves.

  • 邱永南 08-09

       AND ULYSSES answered, "King Alcinous, it is a good thing to hear abard with such a divine voice as this man has. There is nothing betteror more delightful than when a whole people make merry together,with the guests sitting orderly to listen, while the table is loadedwith bread and meats, and the cup-bearer draws wine and fills hiscup for every man. This is indeed as fair a sight as a man can see.Now, however, since you are inclined to ask the story of my sorrows,and rekindle my own sad memories in respect of them, I do not know howto begin, nor yet how to continue and conclude my tale, for the handof heaven has been laid heavily upon me.

  • 吴某良 08-09

      He left the house as he spoke, and went back to Piraeus who gave himwelcome, but the suitors kept looking at one another and provokingTelemachus fly laughing at the strangers. One insolent fellow saidto him, "Telemachus, you are not happy in your guests; first youhave this importunate tramp, who comes begging bread and wine andhas no skill for work or for hard fighting, but is perfectlyuseless, and now here is another fellow who is setting himself up as aprophet. Let me persuade you, for it will be much better, to putthem on board ship and send them off to the Sicels to sell for whatthey will bring."

  • 格兰特 08-08

    {  "'Ulysses,' he answered, 'noble son of Laertes, was not lost atsea in any storm of Neptune's raising, nor did my foes despatch meupon the mainland, but Aegisthus and my wicked wife were the deathof me between them. He asked me to his house, feasted me, and thenbutchered me most miserably as though I were a fat beast in aslaughter house, while all around me my comrades were slain like sheepor pigs for the wedding breakfast, or picnic, or gorgeous banquet ofsome great nobleman. You must have seen numbers of men killed eitherin a general engagement, or in single combat, but you never sawanything so truly pitiable as the way in which we fell in thatcloister, with the mixing-bowl and the loaded tables lying allabout, and the ground reeking with our-blood. I heard Priam's daughterCassandra scream as Clytemnestra killed her close beside me. I laydying upon the earth with the sword in my body, and raised my hands tokill the slut of a murderess, but she slipped away from me; shewould not even close my lips nor my eyes when I was dying, for thereis nothing in this world so cruel and so shameless as a woman when shehas fallen into such guilt as hers was. Fancy murdering her ownhusband! I thought I was going to be welcomed home by my childrenand my servants, but her abominable crime has brought disgrace onherself and all women who shall come after- even on the good ones.'

  • 王建煊 08-07

      "I also saw fair Epicaste mother of king OEdipodes whose awful lotit was to marry her own son without suspecting it. He married herafter having killed his father, but the gods proclaimed the wholestory to the world; whereon he remained king of Thebes, in great grieffor the spite the gods had borne him; but Epicaste went to the houseof the mighty jailor Hades, having hanged herself for grief, and theavenging spirits haunted him as for an outraged mother- to his ruingbitterly thereafter.}

  • 李洲民 08-07

      "And I answered, 'Circe, how can you expect me to be friendly withyou when you have just been turning all my men into pigs? And now thatyou have got me here myself, you mean me mischief when you ask me togo to bed with you, and will unman me and make me fit for nothing. Ishall certainly not consent to go to bed with you unless you willfirst take your solemn oath to plot no further harm against me.'

  • 佩林 08-07

      So Eteoneus bustled back and bade other servants come with him. Theytook their sweating hands from under the yoke, made them fast to themangers, and gave them a feed of oats and barley mixed. Then theyleaned the chariot against the end wall of the courtyard, and ledthe way into the house. Telemachus and Pisistratus were astonishedwhen they saw it, for its splendour was as that of the sun and moon;then, when they had admired everything to their heart's content,they went into the bath room and washed themselves.

  • 邵友伟 08-06

       "The queen is preparing for her marriage with one or other of us.Little does she dream that her son has now been doomed to die."

  • 戴维·斯特恩 08-04

    {  With this he left them to come on at their leisure, while he wentquickly forward and soon reached the house of his master. When hegot there he went in and took his seat among the suitors oppositeEurymachus, who liked him better than any of the others. Theservants brought him a portion of meat, and an upper woman servant setbread before him that he might eat. Presently Ulysses and theswineherd came up to the house and stood by it, amid a sound of music,for Phemius was just beginning to sing to the suitors. Then Ulyssestook hold of the swineherd's hand, and said:

  • 本泽马 08-04

      "Take my advice then, and do not go travelling about for long so farfrom home, nor leave your property with such dangerous people inyour house; they will eat up everything you have among them, and youwill have been on a fool's errand. Still, I should advise you by allmeans to go and visit Menelaus, who has lately come off a voyage amongsuch distant peoples as no man could ever hope to get back from,when the winds had once carried him so far out of his reckoning;even birds cannot fly the distance in a twelvemonth, so vast andterrible are the seas that they must cross. Go to him, therefore, bysea, and take your own men with you; or if you would rather travelby land you can have a chariot, you can have horses, and here are mysons who can escort you to Lacedaemon where Menelaus lives. Beg of himto speak the truth, and he will tell you no lies, for he is anexcellent person."

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