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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:蔡威薇 大小:R6NhrSYm77135KB 下载:wooAwCCK64052次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:Ahpp5di533515条
日期:2020-08-07 23:57:25
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陈志强

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "On this I took comfort in spite of all my sorrow, and said, 'Iknow, then, about these two; tell me, therefore, about the third manof whom you spoke; is he still alive, but at sea, and unable to gethome? or is he dead? Tell me, no matter how much it may grieve me.'
2.  As he spoke he went inside the buildings to the cloister where thesuitors were, but Argos died as soon as he had recognized his master.
3.  On this he put the bow down, letting it lean against the door,with the arrow standing against the tip of the bow. Then he took hisseat again on the seat from which he had risen; and Antinous rebukedhim saying:
4.  On this Minerva said, "Telemachus, what are you talking about?Heaven has a long arm if it is minded to save a man; and if it wereme, I should not care how much I suffered before getting home,provided I could be safe when I was once there. I would rather this,than get home quickly, and then be killed in my own house as Agamemnonwas by the treachery of Aegisthus and his wife. Still, death iscertain, and when a man's hour is come, not even the gods can savehim, no matter how fond they are of him."
5.  "Thus he spoke, and the Achaeans feared no more. The daughters ofthe old man of the sea stood round you weeping bitterly, and clothedyou in immortal raiment. The nine muses also came and lifted uptheir sweet voices in lament- calling and answering one another; therewas not an Argive but wept for pity of the dirge they chaunted. Daysand nights seven and ten we mourned you, mortals and immortals, but onthe eighteenth day we gave you to the flames, and many a fat sheepwith many an ox did we slay in sacrifice around you. You were burnt inraiment of the gods, with rich resins and with honey, while heroes,horse and foot, clashed their armour round the pile as you wereburning, with the tramp as of a great multitude. But when the flamesof heaven had done their work, we gathered your white bones atdaybreak and laid them in ointments and in pure wine. Your motherbrought us a golden vase to hold them- gift of Bacchus, and work ofVulcan himself; in this we mingled your bleached bones with those ofPatroclus who had gone before you, and separate we enclosed also thoseof Antilochus, who had been closer to you than any other of yourcomrades now that Patroclus was no more.
6.  On this she came down from her upper room, and while doing so sheconsidered whether she should keep at a distance from her husbandand question him, or whether she should at once go up to him andembrace him. When, however, she had crossed the stone floor of thecloister, she sat down opposite Ulysses by the fire, against thewall at right angles [to that by which she had entered], while Ulyssessat near one of the bearing-posts, looking upon the ground, andwaiting to see what his wife would say to him when she saw him. Fora long time she sat silent and as one lost in amazement. At one momentshe looked him full in the face, but then again directly, she wasmisled by his shabby clothes and failed to recognize him, tillTelemachus began to reproach her and said:

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1.  "All that you have said is true," answered Euryclea, "but let mebring you some clean clothes- a shirt and cloak. Do not keep theserags on your back any longer. It is not right."
2.  THUS, then, did Ulysses wait and pray; but the girl drove on tothe town. When she reached her father's house she drew up at thegateway, and her brothers- comely as the gods- gathered round her,took the mules out of the waggon, and carried the clothes into thehouse, while she went to her own room, where an old servant,Eurymedusa of Apeira, lit the fire for her. This old woman had beenbrought by sea from Apeira, and had been chosen as a prize forAlcinous because he was king over the Phaecians, and the people obeyedhim as though he were a god. She had been nurse to Nausicaa, and hadnow lit the fire for her, and brought her supper for her into herown room.
3.  Now Venus was just come in from a visit to her father Jove, andwas about sitting down when Mars came inside the house, an said ashe took her hand in his own, "Let us go to the couch of Vulcan: heis not at home, but is gone off to Lemnos among the Sintians, whosespeech is barbarous."
4.  As he spoke he drew his rags aside from the great scar, and whenthey had examined it thoroughly, they both of them wept about Ulysses,threw their arms round him and kissed his head and shoulders, whileUlysses kissed their hands and faces in return. The sun would havegone down upon their mourning if Ulysses had not checked them andsaid:
5.  "Then, being much troubled in mind, I said to my men, 'My friends,it is not right that one or two of us alone should know the propheciesthat Circe has made me, I will therefore tell you about them, sothat whether we live or die we may do so with our eyes open. First shesaid we were to keep clear of the Sirens, who sit and sing mostbeautifully in a field of flowers; but she said I might hear themmyself so long as no one else did. Therefore, take me and bind me tothe crosspiece half way up the mast; bind me as I stand upright,with a bond so fast that I cannot possibly break away, and lash therope's ends to the mast itself. If I beg and pray you to set mefree, then bind me more tightly still.'
6.  BOOK XIV.

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1.  "Mentor," answered Telemachus, "do not let us talk about it anymore. There is no chance of my father's ever coming back; the godshave long since counselled his destruction. There is something else,however, about which I should like to ask Nestor, for he knows muchmore than any one else does. They say he has reigned for threegenerations so that it is like talking to an immortal. Tell me,therefore, Nestor, and tell me true; how did Agamemnon come to diein that way? What was Menelaus doing? And how came false Aegisthusto kill so far better a man than himself? Was Menelaus away fromAchaean Argos, voyaging elsewhither among mankind, that Aegisthus tookheart and killed Agamemnon?"
2.  Then Minerva left Scheria and went away over the sea. She went toMarathon and to the spacious streets of Athens, where she enteredthe abode of Erechtheus; but Ulysses went on to the house of Alcinous,and he pondered much as he paused a while before reaching thethreshold of bronze, for the splendour of the palace was like thatof the sun or moon. The walls on either side were of bronze from endto end, and the cornice was of blue enamel. The doors were gold, andhung on pillars of silver that rose from a floor of bronze, whilethe lintel was silver and the hook of the door was of gold.
3.  Thus did they converse; meanwhile Melanthius the goatherd came up,for he too was bringing in his best goats for the suitors' dinner; andhe had two shepherds with him. They tied the goats up under thegatehouse, and then Melanthius began gibing at Ulysses. "Are you stillhere, stranger," said he, "to pester people by begging about thehouse? Why can you not go elsewhere? You and I shall not come to anunderstanding before we have given each other a taste of our fists.You beg without any sense of decency: are there not feasts elsewhereamong the Achaeans, as well as here?"
4.  "I will tell you everything," answered Ulysses, "quite truly. I comefrom Alybas, where I have a fine house. I am son of king Apheidas, whois the son of Polypemon. My own name is Eperitus; heaven drove meoff my course as I was leaving Sicania, and I have been carried hereagainst my will. As for my ship it is lying over yonder, off theopen country outside the town, and this is the fifth year sinceUlysses left my country. Poor fellow, yet the omens were good forhim when he left me. The birds all flew on our right hands, and bothhe and I rejoiced to see them as we parted, for we had every hope thatwe should have another friendly meeting and exchange presents."
5.   Thus sang the bard, and both Ulysses and the seafaring Phaeacianswere charmed as they heard him.
6.  Thus sang the bard, and both Ulysses and the seafaring Phaeacianswere charmed as they heard him.

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1.  Ulysses' heart now began to fail him, and he said despairingly tohimself, "Alas, Jove has let me see land after swimming so far thatI had given up all hope, but I can find no landing place, for thecoast is rocky and surf-beaten, the rocks are smooth and rise sheerfrom the sea, with deep water close under them so that I cannotclimb out for want of foothold. I am afraid some great wave willlift me off my legs and dash me against the rocks as I leave thewater- which would give me a sorry landing. If, on the other hand, Iswim further in search of some shelving beach or harbour, ahurricane may carry me out to sea again sorely against my will, orheaven may send some great monster of the deep to attack me; forAmphitrite breeds many such, and I know that Neptune is very angrywith me."
2.  But Minerva would not let the suitors for one moment drop theirinsolence, for she wanted Ulysses to become still more bitteragainst them. Now there happened to be among them a ribald fellow,whose name was Ctesippus, and who came from Same. This man,confident in his great wealth, was paying court to the wife ofUlysses, and said to the suitors, "Hear what I have to say. Thestranger has already had as large a portion as any one else; this iswell, for it is not right nor reasonable to ill-treat any guest ofTelemachus who comes here. I will, however, make him a present on myown account, that he may have something to give to the bath-woman,or to some other of Ulysses' servants."
3.  "'So far so good,' said she, when I had ended my story, 'and now payattention to what I am about to tell you- heaven itself, indeed,will recall it to your recollection. First you will come to the Sirenswho enchant all who come near them. If any one unwarily draws in tooclose and hears the singing of the Sirens, his wife and childrenwill never welcome him home again, for they sit in a green field andwarble him to death with the sweetness of their song. There is a greatheap of dead men's bones lying all around, with the flesh stillrotting off them. Therefore pass these Sirens by, and stop yourmen's ears with wax that none of them may hear; but if you like youcan listen yourself, for you may get the men to bind you as youstand upright on a cross-piece half way up the mast, and they mustlash the rope's ends to the mast itself, that you may have thepleasure of listening. If you beg and pray the men to unloose you,then they must bind you faster.
4、  "Thus did they speak, but I answered sorrowfully, 'My men haveundone me; they, and cruel sleep, have ruined me. My friends, mendme this mischief, for you can if you will.'
5、  "Hear me, men of Ithaca, I hope that you may never have a kind andwell-disposed ruler any more, nor one who will govern you equitably; Ihope that all your chiefs henceforward may be cruel and unjust, forthere is not one of you but has forgotten Ulysses, who ruled you asthough he were your father. I am not half so angry with the suitors,for if they choose to do violence in the naughtiness of theirhearts, and wager their heads that Ulysses will not return, they cantake the high hand and eat up his estate, but as for you others I amshocked at the way in which you all sit still without even trying tostop such scandalous goings on-which you could do if you chose, foryou are many and they are few."

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  • 陈国峰 08-06

      As he spoke he snatched his hand from that of Antinous. Meanwhilethe others went on getting dinner ready about the buildings, jeeringat him tauntingly as they did so.

  • 蔡某某 08-06

      "Maids, servants of Ulysses who has so long been absent, go to thequeen inside the house; sit with her and amuse her, or spin, andpick wool. I will hold the light for all these people. They may staytill morning, but shall not beat me, for I can stand a great deal."

  • 胡国庆 08-06

       But Minerva would not let the suitors for one moment drop theirinsolence, for she wanted Ulysses to become still more bitteragainst them. Now there happened to be among them a ribald fellow,whose name was Ctesippus, and who came from Same. This man,confident in his great wealth, was paying court to the wife ofUlysses, and said to the suitors, "Hear what I have to say. Thestranger has already had as large a portion as any one else; this iswell, for it is not right nor reasonable to ill-treat any guest ofTelemachus who comes here. I will, however, make him a present on myown account, that he may have something to give to the bath-woman,or to some other of Ulysses' servants."

  • 黄少祺 08-06

      "After him I saw huge Orion in a meadow full of asphodel driving theghosts of the wild beasts that he had killed upon the mountains, andhe had a great bronze club in his hand, unbreakable for ever and ever.

  • 韩富彪 08-05

    {  "This is the house, father stranger, which you would have me showyou. You will find a number of great people sitting at table, but donot be afraid; go straight in, for the bolder a man is the more likelyhe is to carry his point, even though he is a stranger. First find thequeen. Her name is Arete, and she comes of the same family as herhusband Alcinous. They both descend originally from Neptune, who wasfather to Nausithous by Periboea, a woman of great beauty. Periboeawas the youngest daughter of Eurymedon, who at one time reigned overthe giants, but he ruined his ill-fated people and lost his own lifeto boot.

  • 赵岩 08-04

      Ulysses again glared at him and said, "Though you should give me allthat you have in the world both now and all that you ever shallhave, I will not stay my hand till I have paid all of you in full. Youmust fight, or fly for your lives; and fly, not a man of you shall."}

  • 商衍瀛 08-04

      "When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, I took thethree men on whose prowess of all kinds I could most rely, and wentalong by the sea-side, praying heartily to heaven. Meanwhile thegoddess fetched me up four seal skins from the bottom of the sea,all of them just skinned, for she meant playing a trick upon herfather. Then she dug four pits for us to lie in, and sat down towait till we should come up. When we were close to her, she made uslie down in the pits one after the other, and threw a seal skin overeach of us. Our ambuscade would have been intolerable, for thestench of the fishy seals was most distressing- who would go to bedwith a sea monster if he could help it?-but here, too, the goddesshelped us, and thought of something that gave us great relief, for sheput some ambrosia under each man's nostrils, which was so fragrantthat it killed the smell of the seals.

  • 郭晓梅 08-04

      The suitors were surprised and angry at what had happened, so theywent outside the great wall that ran round the outer court, and held acouncil near the main entrance. Eurymachus, son of Polybus, was thefirst to speak.

  • 肖成玉 08-03

       Minerva answered, "Stranger, you must be very simple, or must havecome from somewhere a long way off, not to know what country thisis. It is a very celebrated place, and everybody knows it East andWest. It is rugged and not a good driving country, but it is by nomeans a bid island for what there is of it. It grows any quantity ofcorn and also wine, for it is watered both by rain and dew; itbreeds cattle also and goats; all kinds of timber grow here, and thereare watering places where the water never runs dry; so, sir, thename of Ithaca is known even as far as Troy, which I understand tobe a long way off from this Achaean country."

  • 亚瑟·苏兹伯格 08-01

    {  "I too," answered Theoclymenus, am an exile, for I have killed a manof my own race. He has many brothers and kinsmen in Argos, and theyhave great power among the Argives. I am flying to escape death attheir hands, and am thus doomed to be a wanderer on the face of theearth. I am your suppliant; take me, therefore, on board your shipthat they may not kill me, for I know they are in pursuit."

  • 贺昉 08-01

      Nurse Euryclea saw him long before any one else did. She was puttingthe fleeces on to the seats, and she burst out crying as she ran up tohim; all the other maids came up too, and covered his head andshoulders with their kisses. Penelope came out of her room lookinglike Diana or Venus, and wept as she flung her arms about her son. Shekissed his forehead and both his beautiful eyes, "Light of my eyes,"she cried as she spoke fondly to him, "so you are come home again; Imade sure I was never going to see you any more. To think of yourhaving gone off to Pylos without saying anything about it or obtainingmy consent. But come, tell me what you saw."

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