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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:乔治娜 大小:s4cCmLc678069KB 下载:dXuhxYsH50574次
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日期:2020-08-07 18:52:23
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Ciutazza, if thou wilt doe for me one nights service, I shall bestowon thee a faire new Smocke. When Ciutazza heard her speake of a newSmocke, instantly she answered. Madame, if you please to bestow anew Smocke on me, were it to runne thorow the fire for you, or anybusinesse of farre greater danger, you onely have the power to commandme, and I will doe it. I will not (said Piccarda) urge thee to anydangerous action, but onely to lodge in my bed this night with aman, and give him courteous entertainement, who shall reward theeliberally for it. But have an especiall care that thou speake notone word, for feare thou shouldst be heard by my Brethren, who (asthou knowest) lodge so neere by; doe this, and then demaund thy Smockeof me. Madame (quoth Ciutazza) if it were to lye with sixe men, ratherthen one; if you say the word, it shall be done.
2.  THE SONG
3.  LED AND GOVERNED BY IDLE PERSWASIONS
4.  Not without much laughter and good liking, was the Tale of MadameAemillia listened unto, and both the prayers commended to be sound andsoveraigne: but it being ended, the King commaunded Philostratus, thathee should follow next in order, whereupon thus he began.
5.  Why how now Friar Reynard? quoth shee, Doe Godfathers use to movesuch questions? Whereto the Friar thus replyed. Madam, when I havelaide off this holy habite (which is a matter very easie for mee todo) I shall seeme in your eye, in all respects made like anotherman, quite from the course of any Religious life. Agnesia, bitingthe lip with a prety smile, said; O my faire Starres! You will neverbee so unfriendly to me. What? You being my Gossip, would you haveme consent unto such a sinne? Our blessed Lady shield mee, for myghostly Father hath often told me, that it is utterly unpardonable:but if it were, I feare too much confiding on mine owne strength.Gossip, the Friar, you speake like a Foole, and feare (in this case)is wholly frivolous, especially, when the motions mooved by such anone as my selfe, who (upon repentance) can grant you pardon andindulgence presently. But I pray you let mee aske you one question,Who is the neerest Kinsman to your Son; either I, that stood at theFont for his Baptisme, or your Husband that begot him? The Lady madeanswere, that it was her Husband. You say very true Gossip, replyedthe Friar, and yet notwithstanding, doth not your Husband (both atboord and bed) enjoy the sweet benefit of your company? Yes, saidthe Lady, why shold he not? Then Lady (quoth Reynard) I, who am not soneere a Kinsman to your Sonne, as your Husband is, why may ye notafford mee the like favour, as you do him? Agnesia, who was noLogitian, and therefore could not stand on any curious answer,especially being so cuningly moved; beleeved, or rather made shew ofbeleeving, that the Godfather said nothing but truth, and thusanswered. What woman is she (Gossip) that knoweth how to answer yourstrange speeches? And, how it came to passe, I know not, but such anagreement passed betweene them, that, for once onely (so it mightnot infrindge the league of Gossip-ship, but that title to countenancetheir further intent) such a favour should be affoorded, so it mightstand cleare from suspition.
6.  Anastasio having attentively heard all this discourse, his hairestood upright like Porcupines quils, and his soule was so shakenwith the terror, that he stept backe to suffer the Knight to do whathe was enjoyned, looking yet with milde commisseration on the poorewoman. Who kneeling Most humbly before the Knight, and stearnelyseized on by the two blood-hounds, he opened her brest with hisweapon, drawing foorth her heart and bowels, which instantly hethrew to the dogges, and they devoured them very greedily. Sooneafter, the Damosell (as if none of this punishment had beneinflicted on her) started up sodainly, running amaine towards theSea shore, and the Hounds swiftly following her, as the Knight did thelike, after he had taken his sword, and was mounted on horsebacke;so that Anastasio had soone lost all sight of them, and could notgesse what was become of them.

计划指导

1.  Gracious Ladies, like as in our faire, cleere, and serene seasons,the Starres are bright ornaments to the heavens, and the flowry fields(so long as the spring time lasteth) weare their goodliest Liveries,the Trees likewise bragging in their best adornings: Even so atfriendly meetings, short, sweet, and sententious words, are the beautyand ornament of any discourse, savouring of wit and sound judgement,worthily deserving to be commended. And so much the rather, because infew and witty words, aptly suting with the time and occasion, moreis delivered then was expected, or sooner answered, then rashlyapprehended: which, as they become men verie highly, yet do theyshew more singular in women.
2.  OCCASIONED BY THOSE TWO POWERFULL COMMANDERS, LOVE AND FORTUNE,
3.  While matters proceeded in this manner, Marquiso and Stechio,understanding how roughly the Potestates Lieutenant dealt withMartellino, and that he had already given him the Strappado; were inheavy perplexity, saying to themselves; we have carried this businessevery badly, redeeming him out of the Frying-pan, and flinging him intothe fire. Whereupon, trudging about from place to place, and meetingat length with their Host, they told him truly how all had happened,whereat hee could not refraine from laughing. Afterward, he wentwith them to one Master Alexander Agolante, who dwelt in Trevers,and was in great credite with the Cities cheefe Magistrate, to whomhee related the whole Discourse; all three earnestly entreating him,to commisserate the case of poore Martellino.
4.  One day Giosefo said to his Wife: Woman, this Gentleman is myintimate friend, and hath borne me company in all my travell: suchdyet therfore as thou wilt welcome him withall, I would have itordered (in dressing) according to his direction. Melisso perceivingthat Giosefo would needs have it to be so; in few words directed hersuch a course, as (for ever) might be to her Husbands contentment. Butshe, not altring a jote from her former disposition, but ratherfarre more froward and tempestuous: delighted to vexe and crossehim, doing every thing quite contrary to the order appointed. WhichGiosefo observing, angerly he said unto her. Was it not tolde you bymy friend, in what manner he would have our Supper drest? Sheturning fiercely to him, replyed. Am I to be directed by him orthee? Supper must and shall bee drest as I will have it: if itpleaseth mee, I care not who doth dislike it; if thou wouldst haveit otherwise, goe seeke both your Suppers where you may have it.
5.  When Scalza heard what they all had to say, he smiling cried: "Youare none of you in the right. I will maintain the family of theBaronchi to be the most ancient and noble not only in Florence butalso in the whole world. All philosophers and such as can besupposed to know that family,. I'm confident, are of my opinion; andthat you may not mistake my meaning I must tell you I mean theBaronchi our neighbours, who dwell near Santa Maria Maggiore." Theyall presently fell a-laughing, and asked him whether he took themfor people of the other world that they should not know the Baronchias well as he. "Gentlemen," says Scalza, "I am so far from takingyou for people of the other world that I will lay any one of you agood supper enough for six on what I affirm, and be judged by whom youplease."
6.  Having thus spoken, he turned to the Lady, saying. Madame, I nowdischarge you of all promises made me, delivering you to yourHusband franke and free: And when he had given him the Lady, and thechild in his armes, he returned to his place, and sate downe againe.Nicoluccio, with no meane joy and hearty contentment received both hiswife and childe, being before farre from expectation of such anadmirable comfort; returning the Knight infinite thankes (as all therest of the Company pany the like) who could not refraine from weepingfor meere joy, for such a strange and wonderful accident: every onehighly commending Gentile, and such also as chanced to hearethereof. The Lady was welcommed home to her owne house, with manymoneths of joviall feasting, and as she passed through the streets,all beheld her with admiration, to be so happily recovered from hergrave Signior Gentile lived long after, a loyall friend toNicoluccio and his Lady, and all that were well-willers to them.

推荐功能

1.  Hereupon, he secretly called Jehannot before him, examining himparticularly of all his passed life, and finding (by most manifestarguments) that his name was truly Geoffrey, and the eldest son ofHenriet Capece, he spake thus to him. Jehannot, thou knowest how greatthe injuries are that thou hast done me, and my deere daughter; gentlyintreating thee (as became an honest servant) that thou shouldestalwayes have bene respective of mine honor, and all that appertaineunto me. There are many noble Gentlemen, who sustaining the wrongwhich thou hast offred me, they would have procured thy shamefulldeath, which pitty and compassion will not suffer in me. Whereforeseeing (as thou informest me) that thou art honourably derived both byfather and mother, I will give end to all thy anguishes, even when thyselfe art so pleased, releasing thee from that captivity wherein Ihave so long kept thee, and in one instant, reduce thine honor andmine into compleat perfection. As thou knowest my daughter Spina, whomthou hast embraced as a friend (although far unfitting for thee, orher) is a widdow, and her marriage is both great and good; what hermanners and conditions are, thou indifferently knowest, and art notignorant of her father and mother: concerning thine owne estate, asnow I purpose not to speake any thing. Therefore, when thou wilt, I amdetermined, that whereas thou hast immodestly affected her, sheshall become thy honest wife, and accepting thee as my sonne, toremaine with me so long as you both please.
2.  FRIENDSHIP AND MARRIAGE TOGETHER
3.  When shee saw the Chest drawing neere her, and not discerning theshape of any man, shee grew fearefull, and retyring from it, cried outaloude. He had no power of speaking to her, neither did his sightdoe him the smallest service; but even as the waves and windespleased, the Chest was driven still neerer to the Land, and then thewoman perceyved that it had the forme of a ofer, and looking moreadvisedly, beheld two armes extended over it, and afterward, sheespied the face of a man, not being able to judge, whether he werealive, or no. Moved by charitable and womanly compassion, shee steptin among the billowes, and getting fast holde on the hayre of hishead, drew both the Chest and him to the Land, and calling forth herDaughters to helpe her, with much adoe she unfolded his armes from theChest, setting it up on her Daughters head, and then betweene them,Landolpho was led into the Towne, and there conveyed into a warmeStove, where quickly he recovered by her pains, his strengthbenummed with extreame cold.
4.  When they were come to the doore, Monna Tessa said to John: Thoumust cough and spet, at such time as I shall bid thee. Well (quothJohn) I will not faile you. Immediately she beganne her prayer in thismanner.
5.   It chanced on a day, a Physicion was brought unto him, being youngin yeeres, but well experienced in his practise: and as hee madetriall of his pulse, Gianetta (who by his Mothers command, attended onhim very diligently) upon some especiall occasion entred into theChamber, which when the young Gentleman perceived, and that sheeneither spake word, nor so much as looked towards him, his heartgrew great in amorous desire, and his pulse did beate beyond thecompasse of ordinary custome; whereof the Physicion made goodobservation, to note how long that fit would continue. No sooner wasGianetta gone forth of the Chamber, but the pulse immediately gaveover beating, which perswaded the Physicion, that some part of thedisease had now discovered it selfe apparantly.
6.  Not long since, there lived in Romania, a Knight, a very honestGentleman, and well qualified, whose name was Messer Lizio daValbonna, to whom it fortuned, that (at his entrance into age) byhis Lady and wife, called Jaquemina, he had a Daughter, the verychoycest and goodliest gentlewoman in all those places. Now becausesuch a happy blessing (in their olde yeeres) was not a littlecomfortable to them; they thought themselves the more bound in duty,to be circumspect of her education, by keeping her out ofover-frequent companies, but onely such as agreed best with theirgravity, and might give the least ill example to their Daughter, whowas named Catharina; as making no doubt, but by this their providentand wary respect, to match her in marriage answerable to their liking.There was also a yong Gentleman, in the very flourishing estate of hisyouthfull time, descended from the Family of the Manardy daBrettinoro, named Messer Ricciardo, who oftentimes frequented theHouse of Messer Lizio, and was a continuall welcome guest to hisTable, Messer Lizio and his wife making the like account of him,even as if hee [had] bene their owne Sonne.

应用

1.  The Lord Abbot recreated himselfe a while with his owne people, towhom he recounted, the course of his life since hee saw them; and theylikewise told him, how kindly they had bin initeated by Ghinotto.But when dinner time was come, the Lord Abbot and all his company,were served with costly viands and excellent Wines, without Ghinottoesmaking himselfe knowne to the Abbot: till after he had beeneentertained some few dayes in this order: into the great Hall of theCastle, Ghinotto caused all the Abbots goods and furniture to beebrought, and likewise into a spacious Court, wheron the windowes ofthe said Court gazed, all his mules and horses, with their sumpters,even to the very silliest of them, which being done, Ghinotto wentto the Abbot, and demaunded of him, how he felt his stomacke now,and whether it would serve him to venter on horsebacke as yet, orno? The Lord Abbot answered, that he found his stomacke perfectlyrecovered, his body strong enough to endure travell, and all thingswell, so hee were delivered from Ghinotto.
2.  "Many Philosophers doe hold opinion, that the actions performed bymortall men, doe proceed from the disposing and ordination of theimmortall gods. Whereupon some doe maintaine, that things which bedone, or never are to be done, proceed of necessity: howbeit someother doe hold, that this necessity is onely referred to thingsdone. Both which opinions (if they be considered with mature judgment)doe most manifestly approve, that they who reprehend any thing whichis irrevocable, doe nothing else but shew themselves, as if theywere wiser then the Gods, who we are to beleeve, that withperpetuall reason, and void of any error, doe dispose and governe bothus, and all our actions; In which respect, how foolish andbeast-like a thing it is, presumptuously to checke or controuletheir operations, you may very easily consider; and likewise, howjustly they deserve condigne punishment, who suffer themselves to betransported in so temerarious a manner.
3.  Wearisome is my life to me,
4、  And never dread to see that joyfull day.
5、  THE FOURTH DAY, THE FIRST NOVELL

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网友评论(yOfLK3Pa60276))

  • 李兰 08-06

      I am sure Andrea, that you greatly marvell at me, in gracing youwith this solemne and kinde entertainment, and why I should so melt myselfe in sighes and teares, at a man that hath no knowledge of mee, orperhaps, sildome or never heard any speeches of mee: but you shallinstantly receive from mee matter to augment your greater marvaile,meeting heere with your owne Sister, beyond all hope or expectation ineyther of us both. But seeing that Heaven hath beene so gracious tome, to let mee see one of my Brethren before I dye (though gladly Iwould have seene them all) which is some addition of comfort to me,and that which (happily) thou hast never heard before, in plaine andtruest manner, I will reveale unto thee.

  • 唐成春 08-06

      The Courtaines being close drawne about the bed, although the seasonwas exceeding hot, they having lighted Torches in their hands; drewopen the Curtaines, and shewed the Bishop his Provoste, close snuggingbetweene the armes of Ciutazza. Upon a sudden the Provoste awaked, andseeing so great a light, as also so many people about him: shame andfeare so daunted him, that hee shrunke downe in the bed, and hid hishead. But the Bishop being displeased at a sight so unseemely, madehim to discover his head againe, to see whom he was in bed withall.Now the poore Provoste perceiving the Gentlewomans deceite, and theproper hansome person so sweetly embracing him: it made him soconfounded with shame, as he had not the power to utter one word:but having put on his cloathes by the Bishops command, hee sent him(under sufficient guard) to his Pallace, to suffer due chastisementfor his sinne committed; and afterward he desired to know, by whatmeanes hee became so favoured of Ciutazza, the whole Historie whereof,the two brethren related at large to him.

  • 唐福新 08-06

       Noble Gentlemen, replyed Thorello (for in mine eye you seeme nolesse) that courtesie which you met with yester-night, I am tothanke Fortune for, more then you, because you were then straited bysuch necessity, as urged your acceptance of my poore Country house.But now this morning, I shall account my selfe much beholding to you(as the like will all these worthy Gentlemen here about you) if you dobut answer kindnes with kindnes, and not refuse to take a homelydinner with them.

  • 柴国旱 08-06

      Perswade your selves (faire Ladies) that Alessandro was in nomeane admiration, when hee heard, that his wife was daughter to theKing of England, unspeakable joy (questionlesse) wholly overcamehim: but the two Knights were not a little troubled and offended, atsuch a straunge and unexpected accident, yea, so violent were theirpassions, that had they beene any where else, then in the Popespresence, Alessandro had felt their furie, and (perhaps) the Princesseher selfe too. On the other side, the Pope was much amazed at thehabite she went disguised in, and likewise at the election of herhusband; but, perceiving there was no resistance to be made againstit, hee yeelded the more willingly to satisfie her desire. Andtherefore, having first comforted the two Knights, and made peacebetweene them, the Princesse, and Alessandro, he gave order for therest that was to be done.

  • 洪天明 08-05

    {  By winkes, words, smiles, in crafty kinde,

  • 陈鹭锋 08-04

      OR OTHERWISE}

  • 杨志勇 08-04

      THE SEVENTH DAY, THE THIRD NOVELL

  • 丁梦林 08-04

      So gently as possible he could, and with the helpe of his man, hetooke her forth of the monument, and layingher softly on his horsebefore him, conveighed her closely to his house in Bologna. SigniorGentile had a worthy Lady to his Mother, a woman of great wisdomeand vertue, who understanding by her Sonne, how matters hadhappened, moved with compassion, and suffering no one in the houseto know what was done, made a good fire, and very excellent Bathe,which recalled back againe wrongwandering life. Then fetching avehement sigh, opening her eyes, and looking very strangly abouther, she said. Alas! where am I now? whereto the good old Ladykindly replyed, saying. Comfort your selfe Madame, for you are in agood place.

  • 訾金雷 08-03

       Melchisedech a Jew, by recounting a Tale of three Rings, to thegreat Soldan, named Saladine, prevented a great danger which wasprepared for him.

  • 盖尔玛 08-01

    {  This Frederigo (as it is no rare matter in yong Gentlemen) becameenamored of a Gentlewoman, named Madam Giana, who was esteemed (in hertime) to be the fairest and most gracious Lady in all Florence. Inwhich respect, and to reach the height of his desire, he made manysumptuous Feasts and Banquets, joustes, Tilties, Tournaments, andall other noble actions of Armes, beside, sending her infinite richand costly presents, making spare of nothing, but lashing all out inlavish expence. Notwithstanding, she being no lesse honest then faire,made no reckoning of whatsoever he did for her sake, or the leastrespect of his owne person. So that Frederigo, spending thus dailymore, then his meanes and ability could maintaine, and no supplies anyway redounding to him, or his faculties (as very easily they might)diminished in such sort, that became so poore; as he had nothingleft him, but a small poore Farme to live upon, the silly reveneweswhereof were so meane, as scarcely allowed him meat and drinke; yethad he a faire Hawke or Faulcon, hardly any where to be fellowed, soexpeditious and sure she was of flight. His low ebbe and poverty, noway quailing his love to the Lady, but rather setting a keener edgethereon; he saw the City life could no longer containe him, where mosthe coveted to abide: and therefore, betooke himselfe to his pooreCountrey Farme, to let his Faulcon get him his dinner and supper,patiently supporting his penurious estate, without suite or meanesmaking to one, for helpe or reliefe in any such necessity.

  • 李铎 08-01

      So, proceeding on in his discourse, he recounted every accident asit hapned, both what they had saide and did unto him, concerning theseverall blowes, with the two Flint-stones, the one hurting himgreevously in the heele, and the other paining him as extreamly in thebacke, with their speeches used then, and his laughter,notwithstanding hee felt the harme of them both, yet beeing proud thathe did so invisibly beguile them. Nay more (quoth he) I cannotforbeare to tell you, that when I passed thorow the Port, I saw youstanding with the Warders; yet, by vertue of that excellent Stone,undiscovered of you all. Beside, going along the streets, I met manyof my Gossips, friends, and familiar acquaintance, such as used daylieto converse with me, and drinking together in every Tavern: yet notone of them spake to me, neyther used any courtesie or salutation;which (indeede) I did the more freely forgive them, because theywere not able to see me.

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