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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:吴坚 大小:UyQ33r2P10782KB 下载:OCGbmHwq52804次
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日期:2020-08-05 17:07:36
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Aegyptius, a man bent double with age, and of infinite experience,the first to speak His son Antiphus had gone with Ulysses to Ilius,land of noble steeds, but the savage Cyclops had killed him whenthey were all shut up in the cave, and had cooked his last dinnerfor him, He had three sons left, of whom two still worked on theirfather's land, while the third, Eurynomus, was one of the suitors;nevertheless their father could not get over the loss of Antiphus, andwas still weeping for him when he began his speech.
2.  To this Eurymachus son of Polybus answered, "Take heart, QueenPenelope daughter of Icarius, and do not trouble yourself aboutthese matters. The man is not yet born, nor never will be, who shalllay hands upon your son Telemachus, while I yet live to look uponthe face of the earth. I say- and it shall surely be- that my spearshall be reddened with his blood; for many a time has Ulysses taken meon his knees, held wine up to my lips to drink, and put pieces of meatinto my hands. Therefore Telemachus is much the dearest friend I have,and has nothing to fear from the hands of us suitors. Of course, ifdeath comes to him from the gods, he cannot escape it." He said thisto quiet her, but in reality he was plotting against Telemachus.
3.  Then Telemachus said, "Mother, I am the only man either in Ithaca orin the islands that are over against Elis who has the right to let anyone have the bow or to refuse it. No one shall force me one way or theother, not even though I choose to make the stranger a present ofthe bow outright, and let him take it away with him. Go, then,within the house and busy yourself with your daily duties, yourloom, your distaff, and the ordering of your servants. This bow is aman's matter, and mine above all others, for it is I who am masterhere."
4.  With these words he led the way, and the others followed after. Aservant hung Demodocus's lyre on its peg for him, led him out of thecloister, and set him on the same way as that along which all thechief men of the Phaeacians were going to see the sports; a crowd ofseveral thousands of people followed them, and there were manyexcellent competitors for all the prizes. Acroneos, Ocyalus, Elatreus,Nauteus, Prymneus, Anchialus, Eretmeus, Ponteus, Proreus, Thoon,Anabesineus, and Amphialus son of Polyneus son of Tecton. There wasalso Euryalus son of Naubolus, who was like Mars himself, and wasthe best looking man among the Phaecians except Laodamas. Three sonsof Alcinous, Laodamas, Halios, and Clytoneus, competed also.
5.  As he spoke he picked up a heifer's foot from the meat-basket inwhich it lay, and threw it at Ulysses, but Ulysses turned his head alittle aside, and avoided it, smiling grimly Sardinian fashion as hedid so, and it hit the wall, not him. On this Telemachus spokefiercely to Ctesippus, "It is a good thing for you," said he, "thatthe stranger turned his head so that you missed him. If you had hithim I should have run you through with my spear, and your father wouldhave had to see about getting you buried rather than married in thishouse. So let me have no more unseemly behaviour from any of you,for I am grown up now to the knowledge of good and evil and understandwhat is going on, instead of being the child that I have beenheretofore. I have long seen you killing my sheep and making free withmy corn and wine: I have put up with this, for one man is no match formany, but do me no further violence. Still, if you wish to kill me,kill me; I would far rather die than see such disgraceful scenes dayafter day- guests insulted, and men dragging the women servantsabout the house in an unseemly way."
6.  On this Minerva came close up to him and said, "Son of Arceisius-best friend I have in the world- pray to the blue-eyed damsel, andto Jove her father; then poise your spear and hurl it."

计划指导

1.  "Thus then were they shut up squealing, and Circe threw them someacorns and beech masts such as pigs eat, but Eurylochus hurried backto tell me about the sad fate of our comrades. He was so overcome withdismay that though he tried to speak he could find no words to doso; his eyes filled with tears and he could only sob and sigh, till atlast we forced his story out of him, and he told us what hadhappened to the others.
2.  "Then Jove let fly with his thunderbolts, and the ship went roundand round, and was filled with fire and brimstone as the lightningstruck it. The men all fell into the sea; they were carried about inthe water round the ship, looking like so many sea-gulls, but thegod presently deprived them of all chance of getting home again.
3.  Penelope presently reached the oak threshold of the store room;the carpenter had planed this duly, and had drawn a line on it so asto get it quite straight; he had then set the door posts into it andhung the doors. She loosed the strap from the handle of the door,put in the key, and drove it straight home to shoot back the boltsthat held the doors; these flew open with a noise like a bullbellowing in a meadow, and Penelope stepped upon the raisedplatform, where the chests stood in which the fair linen and clotheswere laid by along with fragrant herbs: reaching thence, she took downthe bow with its bow case from the peg on which it hung. She satdown with it on her knees, weeping bitterly as she took the bow out ofits case, and when her tears had relieved her, she went to thecloister where the suitors were, carrying the bow and the quiver, withthe many deadly arrows that were inside it. Along with her came hermaidens, bearing a chest that contained much iron and bronze which herhusband had won as prizes. When she reached the suitors, she stoodby one of the bearing-posts supporting the roof of the cloister,holding a veil before her face, and with a maid on either side of her.Then she said:
4.  "Queen Penelope," answered Eurymachus, "we do not suppose thatthis man will take you away with him; it is impossible; but we areafraid lest some of the baser sort, men or women among the Achaeans,should go gossiping about and say, 'These suitors are a feeble folk;they are paying court to the wife of a brave man whose bow not oneof them was able to string, and yet a beggarly tramp who came to thehouse strung it at once and sent an arrow through the iron.' This iswhat will be said, and it will be a scandal against us."
5.  EURYCLEA now went upstairs laughing to tell her mistress that herdear husband had come home. Her aged knees became young again andher feet were nimble for joy as she went up to her mistress and bentover her head to speak to her. "Wake up Penelope, my dear child,"she exclaimed, "and see with your own eyes something that you havebeen wanting this long time past. Ulysses has at last indeed come homeagain, and has killed the suitors who were giving so much trouble inhis house, eating up his estate and ill-treating his son."
6.  Penelope was moved still more deeply as she heard the indisputableproofs that Ulysses laid before her; and when she had again foundrelief in tears she said to him, "Stranger, I was already disposedto pity you, but henceforth you shall be honoured and made welcomein my house. It was I who gave Ulysses the clothes you speak of. Itook them out of the store room and folded them up myself, and Igave him also the gold brooch to wear as an ornament. Alas! I shallnever welcome him home again. It was by an ill fate that he ever setout for that detested city whose very name I cannot bring myselfeven to mention."

推荐功能

1.  Penelope was moved still more deeply as she heard the indisputableproofs that Ulysses laid before her; and when she had again foundrelief in tears she said to him, "Stranger, I was already disposedto pity you, but henceforth you shall be honoured and made welcomein my house. It was I who gave Ulysses the clothes you speak of. Itook them out of the store room and folded them up myself, and Igave him also the gold brooch to wear as an ornament. Alas! I shallnever welcome him home again. It was by an ill fate that he ever setout for that detested city whose very name I cannot bring myselfeven to mention."
2.  "Madam;" answered Ulysses, "who on the face of the whole earth candare to chide with you? Your fame reaches the firmament of heavenitself; you are like some blameless king, who upholds righteousness,as the monarch over a great and valiant nation: the earth yields itswheat and barley, the trees are loaded with fruit, the ewes bringforth lambs, and the sea abounds with fish by reason of his virtues,and his people do good deeds under him. Nevertheless, as I sit here inyour house, ask me some other question and do not seek to know my raceand family, or you will recall memories that will yet more increase mysorrow. I am full of heaviness, but I ought not to sit weeping andwailing in another person's house, nor is it well to be thusgrieving continually. I shall have one of the servants or evenyourself complaining of me, and saying that my eyes swim with tearsbecause I am heavy with wine."
3.  The suitors now aimed a second time, but again Minerva made theirweapons for the most part without effect. One hit a bearing-post ofthe cloister; another went against the door; while the pointed shaftof another struck the wall. Still, Amphimedon just took a piece of thetop skin from off Telemachus's wrist, and Ctesippus managed to grazeEumaeus's shoulder above his shield; but the spear went on and fell tothe ground. Then Ulysses and his men let drive into the crowd ofsuitors. Ulysses hit Eurydamas, Telemachus Amphimedon, and EumaeusPolybus. After this the stockman hit Ctesippus in the breast, andtaunted him saying, "Foul-mouthed son of Polytherses, do not be sofoolish as to talk wickedly another time, but let heaven direct yourspeech, for the gods are far stronger than men. I make you a presentof this advice to repay you for the foot which you gave Ulysses whenhe was begging about in his own house."
4.  "We do not know, Piraeus," answered Telemachus, "what may happen. Ifthe suitors kill me in my own house and divide my property among them,I would rather you had the presents than that any of those peopleshould get hold of them. If on the other hand I manage to kill them, Ishall be much obliged if you will kindly bring me my presents."
5.   Now when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared,Nestor left his couch and took his seat on the benches of white andpolished marble that stood in front of his house. Here aforetime satNeleus, peer of gods in counsel, but he was now dead, and had goneto the house of Hades; so Nestor sat in his seat, sceptre in hand,as guardian of the public weal. His sons as they left their roomsgathered round him, Echephron, Stratius, Perseus, Aretus, andThrasymedes; the sixth son was Pisistratus, and when Telemachus joinedthem they made him sit with them. Nestor then addressed them.
6.TELL ME, O MUSE, of that ingenious hero who travelled far and wideafter he had sacked the famous town of Troy. Many cities did he visit,and many were the nations with whose manners and customs he wasacquainted; moreover he suffered much by sea while trying to savehis own life and bring his men safely home; but do what he might hecould not save his men, for they perished through their own sheerfolly in eating the cattle of the Sun-god Hyperion; so the godprevented them from ever reaching home. Tell me, too, about allthese things, O daughter of Jove, from whatsoever source you mayknow them.

应用

1.  "When I heard him I was in two minds whether or no to draw thekeen blade that hung by my sturdy thigh and cut his head off inspite of his being a near relation of my own; but the men intercededfor him and said, 'Sir, if it may so be, let this fellow stay here andmind the ship, but take the rest of us with you to Circe's house.'
2.  There, then, they left him in very cruel bondage, and having puton their armour they closed the door behind them and went back to taketheir places by the side of Ulysses; whereon the four men stood in thecloister, fierce and full of fury; nevertheless, those who were in thebody of the court were still both brave and many. Then Jove's daughterMinerva came up to them, having assumed the voice and form ofMentor. Ulysses was glad when he saw her and said, "Mentor, lend meyour help, and forget not your old comrade, nor the many good turns hehas done you. Besides, you are my age-mate."
3.  "King Apollo," answered Mercury, "I only wish I might get thechance, though there were three times as many chains- and you mightlook on, all of you, gods and goddesses, but would sleep with her if Icould."
4、  "'My friends,' said I, 'this is not the first time that we have beenin danger, and we are in nothing like so bad a case as when theCyclops shut us up in his cave; nevertheless, my courage and wisecounsel saved us then, and we shall live to look back on all this aswell. Now, therefore, let us all do as I say, trust in Jove and row onwith might and main. As for you, coxswain, these are your orders;attend to them, for the ship is in your hands; turn her head away fromthese steaming rapids and hug the rock, or she will give you theslip and be over yonder before you know where you are, and you will bethe death of us.'
5、  Then Penelope came down from her room looking like Venus or Diana,and they set her a seat inlaid with scrolls of silver and ivory nearthe fire in her accustomed place. It had been made by Icmalius and hada footstool all in one piece with the seat itself; and it wascovered with a thick fleece: on this she now sat, and the maids camefrom the women's room to join her. They set about removing thetables at which the wicked suitors had been dining, and took awaythe bread that was left, with the cups from which they had drunk. Theyemptied the embers out of the braziers, and heaped much wood upon themto give both light and heat; but Melantho began to rail at Ulysses asecond time and said, "Stranger, do you mean to plague us by hangingabout the house all night and spying upon the women? Be off, youwretch, outside, and eat your supper there, or you shall be driven outwith a firebrand."

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  • 彭纯特 08-04

      "I heard of Ithaca," said he, "when I was in Crete beyond theseas, and now it seems I have reached it with all these treasures. Ihave left as much more behind me for my children, but am flyingbecause I killed Orsilochus son of Idomeneus, the fleetest runner inCrete. I killed him because he wanted to rob me of the spoils I hadgot from Troy with so much trouble and danger both on the field ofbattle and by the waves of the weary sea; he said I had not served hisfather loyally at Troy as vassal, but had set myself up as anindependent ruler, so I lay in wait for him and with one of myfollowers by the road side, and speared him as he was coming into townfrom the country. my It was a very dark night and nobody saw us; itwas not known, therefore, that I had killed him, but as soon as Ihad done so I went to a ship and besought the owners, who werePhoenicians, to take me on board and set me in Pylos or in Eliswhere the Epeans rule, giving them as much spoil as satisfied them.They meant no guile, but the wind drove them off their course, andwe sailed on till we came hither by night. It was all we could do toget inside the harbour, and none of us said a word about supper thoughwe wanted it badly, but we all went on shore and lay down just as wewere. I was very tired and fell asleep directly, so they took my goodsout of the ship, and placed them beside me where I was lying uponthe sand. Then they sailed away to Sidonia, and I was left here ingreat distress of mind."

  • 姜你军 08-04

      The words were hardly out of his mouth before his son stood at thedoor. Eumaeus sprang to his feet, and the bowls in which he was mixingwine fell from his hands, as he made towards his master. He kissed hishead and both his beautiful eyes, and wept for joy. A father could notbe more delighted at the return of an only son, the child of his oldage, after ten years' absence in a foreign country and after havinggone through much hardship. He embraced him, kissed him all over asthough he had come back from the dead, and spoke fondly to him saying:

  • 赖文玉 08-04

       "My friend," answered Nestor, "you recall a time of much sorrow tomy mind, for the brave Achaeans suffered much both at sea, whileprivateering under Achilles, and when fighting before the great cityof king Priam. Our best men all of them fell there- Ajax, Achilles,Patroclus peer of gods in counsel, and my own dear son Antilochus, aman singularly fleet of foot and in fight valiant. But we sufferedmuch more than this; what mortal tongue indeed could tell the wholestory? Though you were to stay here and question me for five years, oreven six, I could not tell you all that the Achaeans suffered, and youwould turn homeward weary of my tale before it ended. Nine longyears did we try every kind of stratagem, but the hand of heaven wasagainst us; during all this time there was no one who could comparewith your father in subtlety- if indeed you are his son- I canhardly believe my eyes- and you talk just like him too- no one wouldsay that people of such different ages could speak so much alike. Heand I never had any kind of difference from first to last neither incamp nor council, but in singleness of heart and purpose we advisedthe Argives how all might be ordered for the best.

  • 李园园 08-04

      "Trust me for that," said she, "I will not lose sight of you whenonce we set about it, and I would imagine that some of those who aredevouring your substance will then bespatter the pavement with theirblood and brains. I will begin by disguising you so that no humanbeing shall know you; I will cover your body with wrinkles; youshall lose all your yellow hair; I will clothe you in a garment thatshall fill all who see it with loathing; I will blear your fine eyesfor you, and make you an unseemly object in the sight of thesuitors, of your wife, and of the son whom you left behind you. Thengo at once to the swineherd who is in charge of your pigs; he has beenalways well affected towards you, and is devoted to Penelope andyour son; you will find him feeding his pigs near the rock that iscalled Raven by the fountain Arethusa, where they are fattening onbeechmast and spring water after their manner. Stay with him andfind out how things are going, while I proceed to Sparta and seeyour son, who is with Menelaus at Lacedaemon, where he has gone to tryand find out whether you are still alive."

  • 刘建龙 08-03

    {  "But how, Mentor," replied Telemachus, "dare I go up to Nestor,and how am I to address him? I have never yet been used to holdinglong conversations with people, and am ashamed to begin questioningone who is so much older than myself."

  • 江子华 08-02

      As he spoke he reeled, and fell sprawling face upwards on theground. His great neck hung heavily backwards and a deep sleep tookhold upon him. Presently he turned sick, and threw up both wine andthe gobbets of human flesh on which he had been gorging, for he wasvery drunk. Then I thrust the beam of wood far into the embers to heatit, and encouraged my men lest any of them should turnfaint-hearted. When the wood, green though it was, was about to blaze,I drew it out of the fire glowing with heat, and my men gathered roundme, for heaven had filled their hearts with courage. We drove thesharp end of the beam into the monster's eye, and bearing upon it withall my weight I kept turning it round and round as though I wereboring a hole in a ship's plank with an auger, which two men with awheel and strap can keep on turning as long as they choose. Eventhus did we bore the red hot beam into his eye, till the boiling bloodbubbled all over it as we worked it round and round, so that the steamfrom the burning eyeball scalded his eyelids and eyebrows, and theroots of the eye sputtered in the fire. As a blacksmith plunges an axeor hatchet into cold water to temper it- for it is this that givesstrength to the iron- and it makes a great hiss as he does so, eventhus did the Cyclops' eye hiss round the beam of olive wood, and hishideous yells made the cave ring again. We ran away in a fright, buthe plucked the beam all besmirched with gore from his eye, andhurled it from him in a frenzy of rage and pain, shouting as he did soto the other Cyclopes who lived on the bleak headlands near him; sothey gathered from all quarters round his cave when they heard himcrying, and asked what was the matter with him.}

  • 王正荣 08-02

      And Eumaeus answered, "Old man, you have told us an excellent story,and have said nothing so far but what is quite satisfactory; for thepresent, therefore, you shall want neither clothing nor anythingelse that a stranger in distress may reasonably expect, butto-morrow morning you have to shake your own old rags about yourbody again, for we have not many spare cloaks nor shirts up here,but every man has only one. When Ulysses' son comes home again he willgive you both cloak and shirt, and send you wherever you may want togo."

  • 朱昌杰 08-02

      "Some things, Telemachus," answered Minerva, "will be suggested toyou by your own instinct, and heaven will prompt you further; for I amassured that the gods have been with you from the time of your birthuntil now."

  • 瓦达格 08-01

       On either side there stood gold and silver mastiffs which Vulcan,with his consummate skill, had fashioned expressly to keep watchover the palace of king Alcinous; so they were immortal and couldnever grow old. Seats were ranged all along the wall, here and therefrom one end to the other, with coverings of fine woven work which thewomen of the house had made. Here the chief persons of the Phaeciansused to sit and eat and drink, for there was abundance at all seasons;and there were golden figures of young men with lighted torches intheir hands, raised on pedestals, to give light by night to thosewho were at table. There are fifty maid servants in the house, some ofwhom are always grinding rich yellow grain at the mill, while otherswork at the loom, or sit and spin, and their shuttles go, backwardsand forwards like the fluttering of aspen leaves, while the linen isso closely woven that it will turn oil. As the Phaecians are thebest sailors in the world, so their women excel all others in weaving,for Minerva has taught them all manner of useful arts, and they arevery intelligent.

  • 魏苇 07-30

    {  WHEN the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared,Telemachus bound on his sandals and took a strong spear that suitedhis hands, for he wanted to go into the city. "Old friend," said he tothe swineherd, "I will now go to the town and show myself to mymother, for she will never leave off grieving till she has seen me. Asfor this unfortunate stranger, take him to the town and let him begthere of any one who will give him a drink and a piece of bread. Ihave trouble enough of my own, and cannot be burdened with otherpeople. If this makes him angry so much the worse for him, but Ilike to say what I mean."

  • 郭晶晶 07-30

      "My father is dead and gone," answered Telemachus, "and even if somerumour reaches me I put no more faith in it now. My mother does indeedsometimes send for a soothsayer and question him, but I give hisprophecyings no heed. As for the stranger, he was Mentes, son ofAnchialus, chief of the Taphians, an old friend of my father's." Butin his heart he knew that it had been the goddess.

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